Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for April 19th or search for April 19th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years was William H. Underwood. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 10th of May, at which it was voted to raise a company of one hundred men for a Coast Guard; and a committee of five was appointed to confer with the authorities of other towns on the Cape in regard to the same. June 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow one thousand dollars for war purposes. 1862. April 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists in the military service for three years, and is credited to the town. July 26th, The bounty was raised to two hundred dollars, and the selectmen were directed to fill the quota of the town as soon as possible. August 19th, Voted, to pay volunteers for nine months service a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars, which, on September 11th, was increased fifty dollars; and Valentine Doane, Jr., and Danforth S. Ste
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
, Nathaniel B. Borden, Daniel Stillwell, Walter Paine, 3d, Philip D. Borden. The city-clerk and city-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Alvan S. Ballard; in 1864 and 1865, George A. Ballard. 1861. A citizens' meeting was held on the 19th of April, Hon. Nathaniel B. Borden chairman; at which it was voted, that the Government of the Union shall be preserved. The city government was requested to appropriate ten thousand dollars to provide outfits for volunteers and support for their famGeorge F. Kingman, Matthew Howland, John H. Perry, aldermen. The city-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Sanford S. Horton; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Henry T. Leonard. The city-treasurer during all the years of the war was James B. Congdon. 1861. April 19th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for the benefit of the City Guards, to be expended under the direction of the mayor and a committee of the city council. Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for the formation of a Home and Coast Guar
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
be made into articles for the use of the volunteers. On the receipt of the news of the death of Sumner Henry Needham, who fell in Baltimore on the memorable 19th of April, and whose name has become historical as one of the first martyrs of the Rebellion, the following resolutions were passed by both branches of the city governmeThe citytreas-urer during all of these years was Charles E. Symonds. 1861. The first vote passed by the city council, having relation to the war, was on the 19th of April, when it was— Ordered, That the sum of fifteen thousand dollars be, and hereby is, appropriated for the benefit of the families of those of our fellowciti-tions for such volunteer companies as may be encamped within the limits of the city, to be expended under the direction of the Joint Special Committee appointed April 19th. On the 26th of April an order was passed directing the Joint Special Committee to expend from the appropriations already made five hundred dollars for unif
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
0, 1,448; in 1865, 1,563. Valuation in 1860, $682,660; in 1865, $822,620. The selectmen in 1861 were E. M. Whitney, Pliny Fisk, Ira W. Barnard; in 1862 and 1863, Pliny Fisk, R. B. Bardwell, Ira W. Barnard; in 1864, Pliny Fisk, R. B. Bardwell, John A. Andrews; in 1865, Pliny Fisk, R. B. Bardwell, Amasa Bardwell. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of the years of the war was C. M. Duncan. 1861. The first meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 19th of April, at which it was voted to appropriate five hundred dollars to buy uniforms for Company H, Tenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. July 3d, One thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to the families of volunteers. November 5th, Four hundred and ninety-eight dollars and fifty cents were voted to reimburse subscriptions made by individuals for the volunteers of Company H, Tenth Regiment. 1862. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in re
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ived of the attack upon the Sixth Regiment in Baltimore (April 19th), great indignation was expressed. A citizens' meeting n the staff over the city hall until otherwise ordered. April 19th, The mayor called a special meeting of the city council, in Concord was a popular citizens' meeting held on the 19th of April, the day on which the Concord Company G, Fifth Regimenthe march of the Sixth Regiment through Baltimore on the 19th of April. 1862. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to bor Seventh Regiment, in passing through Baltimore on the 19th of April, many of the young men of Framingham enrolled themselve was ordered to be displayed upon the public buildings. April 19th, Authority was given to gentlemen to organize new militas. 1861. On the day the Massachusetts Sixth Regiment (April 19th) was attacked in Baltimore, the selectmen issued a warrate April 17th, and was attacked by the mob in Baltimore, April 19th, and the captain and first lieutenant were wounded. A f
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
ames E. Adams, William Seaver, Richard Holmes, Moses H. Day, John F. Newton, aldermen. In 1865, George Lewis, mayor; Samuel Little, William C. Harding, Daniel Jackson, James E. Adams, William Seaver, Richard Holmes, Moses H. Day, John F. Newton, aldermen. The city-clerk during all the years of the war was Joseph W. Tucker. The city-treasurer during the same period was Joseph W. Dudley. 1861. A special meeting of the city government was called by Mayor Gaston on the evening of the 19th of April, who sent in a message calling the attention of the council to the perilous condition of the country. The Sixth Massachusetts had been attacked in Baltimore on that day, and the first blood shed in the Rebellion. The message was referred to a committee, which reported an order appropriating twenty thousand dollars, and appointing the mayor and two members of the board of aldermen, with such as the common council might join, with discretionary power to expend the same. April 22d, The
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
conclusion, in such wise demonstrating to the world that ours is alike a Government of equity and of energy, with the clemency but not less with the power of a parent. Resolved, That his honor the mayor be requested to communicate authentic copies of these resolutions to the President of the United States, and to such other persons or public corporations as may seem wise and expedient. These resolutions were read twice, and assigned for consideration on Monday next at six o'clock. April 19th, One hundred thousand dollars were appropriated for the good care and comfort of the soldiers who may be in Boston. April 22d, It was resolved that for any officer of the city who should enter the military service his place should be kept and his pay continued while absent in the military service. The resolves offered by Alderman Wilson were unanimously adopted, with slight verbal amendments. April 24th, Aldermen Parmenter and Spinney, and Messrs. Brown, Borrowscale, and Roberts of the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
eed. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Sylvanus E. Twitchell; in 1865, Nathaniel Richardson. 1861. A public town-meeting was held on the 19th of April, at which upwards of forty young men offered themselves for the formation of a military company. The first legal town-meeting was held on the 30th of April, ak during the three months that Mr. Edes was at Port Royal, South Carolina. The town-treasurer during all the years of the war was C. C. Moore. 1861. On the 19th of April, when information was received that our Sixth Regiment had been attacked in Baltimore, the selectmen issued the following call for a public meeting: Citizens oucted the passage of Massachusetts soldiers in their march through Baltimore to the defence of the capital, killing several and wounding others—this too on the 19th of April, the anniversary of the day when the blood of Massachusetts men was shed in Lexington, in 1775—therefore, resolved, first, that it is the duty of every America