Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for April 23rd or search for April 23rd in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
e no conscriptions; and therefore a draft upon her citizens, in order to meet the second call of the Commander-in-chief for troops, should be avoided at every reasonable sacrifice, as well as by energetic and legitimate action. 1863. Nothing of special interest appears to have been done, in legal town-meeting, in regard to the war during this year, although the selectmen continued to recruit volunteers, and to pay State aid to soldiers' families. 1864. At a town-meeting held on the 23d of April, the following resolution was passed:— Resolved, That we do hereby exonerate our selectmen from the contumely cast upon them by the writer of an article that appears in the Republican Standard of Feb. 25, 1864, entitled Recruiting in Westport, and still retain the utmost confidence in them as gentlemen of ability and integrity, and hereby tender them our sincere thanks and approbation for their energy and faithfulness in carrying out the instructions (adopted at the various meetings
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
A similar vote was passed in regard to paying bounties to complete the quota of the town; also, to authorize the treasurer to settle the volunteer bounty tax with the Treasurer of the Commonwealth by securing the balance due the town. 1864. April 23d, Voted, to raise four hundred and fifty dollars to reimburse individual citizens who had contributed money to fill the quota of the town in 1863, and the selectmen were authorized to keep on recruiting to fill any quota until March, 1865; the b, Henry R. Newton; in 1865, William C. Grout, Henry R. Newton, James A. Loker. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Henry Wright. 1861. Large and enthusiastic meetings of citizens were held on the 22d and 23d of April to consider the state of the country. After singing and speaking, it was voted to organize and drill a company for military service; also a company of minute men to practise with the use of weapons, and be ready to respond to emergencies. A
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
1863, $1,530.41; in 1864, $1,301.01; in 1865, $900.00. Total amount, $5,129.45. Medway Incorporated Oct. 24, 1713. Population in 1860, 3,195; in 1865, 3,223. Valuation in 1860, $1,210,746; in 1865, $1,251,393. The selectmen in 1861 were Joel P. Adams, William Daniels, Simeon Fisher; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, William Daniels, Simeon Fisher, Clark Patridge. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was A. M. B. Fuller. 1861. A citizens' meeting was held April 23d which was largely attended, at which several gentlemen made patriotic speeches. April 29th, A legal town-meeting was held, at which M. M. Fisher made a report representing the state of the country, and the duty of loyal men to stand by the Government and the Constitution, closing with several excellent resolutions, of which we select the following:— Resolved, By the citizens of Medway, that we cherish with unalterable devotion the Constitution adopted by our Fathers, and will inflexib
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty to each volunteer for nine months service who should enlist and be credited to the quota of the town, and to borrow money to pay the same. R. N. Jones, Noah Prince, and Philander Cobb were appointed to assist the selectmen to procure volunteers. 1863. No special action appears to have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity in regard to the war during this year, although recruiting and the payment of State aid were continued. 1864. April 23d, The selectmen were directed to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer belonging to Kingston who had enlisted previous to that time and had received no bounty, and two thousand dollars to be raised by taxation were appropriated to meet the expenditure. May 31st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who should enlist and be credited to the town up to March 1, 1865. The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money.