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ildren. There are three of them. These are my chiefs. These are the men who went into the braves' lodge to give themselves up. Father, I have received these young men; I now deliver them to you. Keokuk spoke to the same effect. General Atkinson expressed himself satisfied, and promised generous treatment to the young men who had given themselves up. He also promised protection to the friendly Sacs and Foxes, and threatened punishment to Black Hawk's band. The journal continues: April 24th.-General Atkinson, having sent several persons to the British band of Indians, and hearing nothing of them, resolved to dispatch two young Sacs with a mild talk. April 26th.--The two young Sacs returned to day from the British band, bringing Black Hawk's answer, which was, that his heart was bad, and that he was determined not to turn back. On April 27th Mr. Gratiot brought word from the Prophet's village that Black Hawk's band had run up the British flag, and was decidedly hostile.
on-sense and nauseated the loyal stomach of the nation; but it was the opiate that stupefied both the common-sense and the moral sense, and unnerved the arm of the people of Kentucky. When Mr. Lincoln made his first call for troops, Governor Magoffin replied in the same spirit with the other Southern Executives: Your dispatch is received. In answer, I say emphatically, Kentucky will furnish no troops for the wicked purpose of subduing her sister Southern States. And on the 24th of April, in a proclamation convening the General Assembly, the Governor said: The tread of armies is the response which is being made to the measures of pacification which are being discussed before our people; while up to this moment we are comparatively in a defenseless attitude. Whatever else should be done, it is, in my judgment, the duty of Kentucky, without delay, to place herself in a complete position for defense. On May 16th the General Assembly, which had convened May 6th, R