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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
ted with the Rebellion appears to have been held during this year, although the greatest activity prevailed among the citizens in recruiting volunteers, and giving proper assistance to the soldiers' families. 1864. At a meeting held on the 25th of April, the town voted to raise the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each and every one of its quota called for by the President, Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864; and that the sum be expended in refunding money paid by individual subscaid; also to the widows, like town aid. This vote was in effect to give aid to the families of volunteers in twice the amount that was allowed by law and reimbursed to the towns by the State. It was a literal voluntary gratuity by the town. April 25th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist prior to March 1, 1865, for three years, and be credited to the town. Truro furnished one hundred and forty-four men for
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
o soldiers' families. October 15th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting under the last calls of the President, and credited to the quota of the town. 1863. March 2d, Appropriated five hundred dollars for State aid to families of volunteers, and on the 3d of November ten hundred and fifty-nine dollars and seventy-eight cents for the benefit of volunteers. 1864. March 7th, Voted, to raise one thousand dollars for State aid to soldiers' families. April 25th, Voted, to raise a sufficient sum to fill all quotas up to the present time, not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each man. A similar vote was passed on the 27th of June. 1865. March 6th, The same amount of bounty was voted to be paid to volunteers to the end of the year. Hawley furnished eighty-one men for the war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the tow
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
the soldiers' families. 1863. October 9th, The treasurer of the town was authorized to borrow such sums of money as may be necessary to adjust certain accounts of money paid to volunteers. December 18th, A committee of nine was appointed to act in concert with the selectmen in procuring volunteers to fill the quota of the town, and to procure and disburse money subscriptions in aid of recruiting. The meeting voted to act as a committee of the whole in aid of the same objects. 1864. April 25th, The town voted to raise by a tax four thousand two hundred and fifty dollars to pay bounties to thirty-four men enlisting to the credit of the town. June 4th, Voted, to authorize the treasurer to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars up to March 1, 1865, to each recruit who shall be mustered into the service of the United States and credited to the quota of the town. Longmeadow furnished one hundred and thirty-nine men for the war (of whom fourteen were substitutes put i
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
y of seventy-five dollars to each volunteer credited to the town who shall enlist for nine months in the military service. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money for that purpose. October 4th, The treasurer was directed to pay back to the several collectors all moneys paid in by them as bounty money for the town's first quota of three hundred thousand men, and that the town treasurer be authorized to borrow six hundred dollars to pay equally to each of the six volunteers. 1863. April 25th, The town voted to raise seventeen hundred and fifty dollars for the payment of bounties to volunteers. 1864. July 22d, The selectmen and treasurer were authorized to borrow money to refund to each man who has paid commutation or has furnished a substitute, or who may pay it under the last two calls of the president for men, one hundred and twenty-five dollars; also, to borrow fifteen hundred dollars to aid, when needed, to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town under any futu
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ettle with the State Treasurer for the proportion of Lincoln of the volunteer bounty tax as authorized by law. 1864. April 25th, Fourteen hundred dollars were appropriated to refund money raised by individual subscription, and paid for recruiting rized to borrow such sums of money under instructions from the selectmen as shall be wanted from time to time. 1862. April 25th, Voted, to appropriate a sum of money not to exceed twelve hundred dollars for the support of the families of volunteerrafted men or their substitutes, if mustered in to the credit of the town; also, to pay aid to their families. 1864. April 25th, Voted, to repay to citizens of the town the amounts they had severally subscribed and paid for recruiting purposes. Mde were appointed to pursue such a course as they think for the best, to carry the foregoing vote into effect. 1864. April 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
service, and to provide for the families of the men who shall be mustered in to said service. The use of the city hall was granted to the Chelsea Light Infantry for drilling purposes. A flag staff was ordered to be erected on the city hall, and from which the flag should be displayed until otherwise ordered. A proposition was made by citizens to form a military organization to act as an extra police force during the absence of the military from the city, which was unanimously approved. April 25th, A report was made to the aldermen that a flag-staff had been procured, and that certain ladies of Chelsea had volunteered to make the flag, and had presented it to the city as a memento of their patriotism in the present hour of our national troubles. The flag was accepted, their communication placed on file, and a vote of thanks passed for the gift. The following is a copy of the letter:— Chelsea, April 20, 1861. To E. W. Lothrop, Esq., in behalf of the citizens of Chelsea. Sir
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
died or may die in the service of the Federal Government, provided the friends of the deceased request it. 1864. March meeting, The selectmen were instructed to furnish such aid to families of volunteers as will be reimbursed by the State. April 25th, Voted, to grant seven hundred and fifty dollars to pay bounties to five recruits. August 1st, The selectmen were authorized to pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars to any person liable to draft who furnished a substitute; also, to keep on k during the years of the war was Samuel M. Briggs. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Josiah Childs; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Daniel F. Norton. 1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters in regard to the war was held on the 25th of April, when it was voted to appropriate five thousand dollars to organize and equip a military company; to pay the men for time spent in drilling; to furnish uniforms, and to add a certain sum to their monthly pay when in active service. The Com