Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for April 25th or search for April 25th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
air with the call to prayer, a group of exiles from many lands gathered in the pleasant English-looking drawingroom. From the windows they could look down upon the flower-decked Piazza di Spagna, hear the song of the nightingales in the Villa Medici, breathe the perfume of violets and almond blossoms from the Pincio. This morning, or another, Paul Sabatier was among the listeners, a grave, gracious man, a Savoyard pastor, whose Life of Saint Francis of Assisi had set all Rome talking. April 25. To lunch with the Drapers. Had some good talk with Mr. D. [the American Ambassador]. He was brought up at Hopedale in the Community, of which his father was a member, his mother not altogether acquiescing. He went into our Civil War when only twenty years of age, having the day before married a wife. He was badly wounded in the battle of the Wilderness. Mosby [guerilla] met the wounded train, and stripped them of money and watches, taking also the horses of their conveyances. A young
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
t than I had hoped. He made a rather flowery discourse, and eulogized Annie Sullivan and Helen Keller as a New experience in human society. In order to show how the good that men do survives them, I referred to Dr. Howe's first efforts for the Blind and to his teaching of Laura Bridgman, upon whom I dwelt somewhat.... April 23. ... had a sort of dream-vision of the dear Christ going through Beacon Street in shadow, and then in his glory. It was only a flash of a moment's thought... April 25. to Alliance, the last meeting of the season. Mrs.--- spoke, laying the greatest emphasis on Women acting so as to express themselves in freedom. this ideal of self-expression appears to me insufficient and dangerous, if taken by itself. I mentioned its insufficiency, while recognizing its importance. I compared feminine action under the old limitations to the touching of an electric eel, which immediately gives one a paralyzing shock. I spoke also of the New Woman world as at present
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
ly counsel may become me at this moment, let me say to the women here assembled: Do not let us go back from what we have gained. Let us, on the contrary, press ever forward in the light of the new knowledge, of the new experience. If we have rocked the cradle, if we have soothed the slumbers of mankind, let us be on hand at their great awakening, to make steadfast the peace of the world! She was glad afterward that she had not gone; but a significant corollary to the matter appears on April 25:-- Providence — a pleasant trip, made possible by dear Laura's departure. (That is, dear Laura knew nothing about it till afterward. How often we recalled the old Quaker's saying to her, It was borne in upon me at an early period that if I told no one what I intended to do, I should be enabled to do it! ) In the last week of April ( dear Laura being still absent) she spoke four times in public, on four successive days. These addresses were at the Kindergarten for the Blind ( I mi