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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
re defence of Garrison and Collins by Elizabeth Pease and William Smeal as a species of persecution directed against himself, and as a gratuitous giving up of the slave's cause. When Miss Pease had obtained from Mss. Jan. 14, Mar. 17, 1841, E. Pease to Collins. America a truthful statement of Mr. Garrison's part in the Chardon-Street Convention, at the hands of the Quaker James Cannings Fuller, the London Committee Ante, 2.425. refused her request to give it the same currency which Mss. Apr. 27, E. Pease to J. Scoble (May?), 1841, to Collins. they had given to Colver's libel. W. L. Garrison to Elizabeth Pease, Darlington, England. Boston, March 1, 1841. Ms. I am very much obliged to you for your letter by the Britannia, and do not regret, on the whole, that bro. Collins has concluded to remain until the sailing of the steamer of the 4th inst., though I trust he will not miss coming at that time, for his presence here now is indispensable. In whatever he has been calle
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
litionists. From the Tappans and their associates of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society they received in silence a long and solemn warning not to prosecute their tour through the Lib. 14.65. South, since it would inevitably commit them to the palliation of slavery. They were also fully advised, in the same communication, of the pro-slavery character of the Presbyterian organization in this country. This letter, dated April 2, 1844, was followed by one privately addressed on April 27 by Mr. Garrison to the Lib. 16.73. Rev. William Chalmers, one of the Commissioners, inviting him to be one of the speakers at the approaching anniversary of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York. Mr. Chalmers, however, was not prone to make entangling alliances. He had happened to be in New Bedford on April 13, 14, when Mr. Garrison was lecturing on Non-Resistance, the Sabbath, the Ministry, and the Church; and though he took good care not to go and listen to him, he prudently pr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
. 25.75. Governor, praying for the removal of Edward Greely Loring from his office of Judge of Probate for having, as United States Commissioner, sent Anthony Burns back into bondage. This action was in response to petitions Lib. 25.23. actively circulated by the abolitionists, and to arguments Lib. 25.30, 33, 35, 59. at special hearings, in which Wendell Phillips distinguished himself. Though overruled by Governor Henry J. Gardner. Gardner, it had the moral effect intended. When, on April 27, the Senate came to vote upon it, Mr. Garrison was taken Lib. 25.70. from the throng of spectators and given a chair beside the President. Simultaneously with this advertisement, that the State washed its official hands of all complicity in the execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, came the passage of An Act to protect the rights and liberties of the people of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Lib. 25.71, 79; Acts and Resolves of Mass., p. 924. This, too, was in response to petitions a