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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 369 369 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 253 253 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 13 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for April 30th or search for April 30th in all documents.

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or spoken to you, in greater kindness of feeling, than now, nor with a fuller purpose to sustain you. so far as in my most anxious judgment I consistently can. But you must act. Yours, very truly, A. Lincoln. The President's question as to the grave discrepancy between the 85,000 men, admitted to be with or on their way to him by Gen. M., and the 108,000 asserted by Secretary Stanton, was never answered, and probably could not be; since an official return of the number of his Army April 30th, while it was still before Yorktown, makes its aggregate 130,378, whereof 112,392 were present and fit for duty; Franklin's division of 12,448 men having in the mean time been sent to him. But, on another point, military men are not likely to agree with the President. Gen. Wool's command may very probably have been doing just what an equal number of McClellan's troops must have done if that command was away ; but it is by no means the same thing to a commander in the field to have 10,0
rch 20, 1862. by Mr. Hickman, of Pa., its Chairman--because the President has all power now --it had been referred April 23. to a Select Committee of seven, whereof Mr. Sedgwick, of N. Y., was Chairman; whence Mr. Eliot, of Mass., reported April 30. two bills, one providing for confiscating the property, the other for emancipating the slaves, of persistent Rebels; whereupon debate was renewed and continued for days — every Democrat and nearly every Border-State member resisting Emancipatioax whatever. His bill proposed simply that the city revenue raised for schools by the taxation of Blacks should be devoted to the education of their own children, and not those of the Whites. This bill having been referred to and reported April 30. from the District Committee, it was taken up, May 8. on motion of Mr. Grimes; and certain nonessential amendments of the Committee agreed to. Mr. Wilson, of Mass., then moved to add a new section, as follows: That all persons of color in
oss his army at a point where little resistance was anticipated. Accordingly, at dark, our gunboats again engaged the batteries, while our transports ran by them; receiving but two or three shots, which did them no essential harm. Finally, having learned from a negro that there was a good road from the little hamlet of Bruinsburg, half way down to Rodney, running back to Port Gibson, in the rear of Grand Gulf, the General decided to cross at this point; and, by daylight next morning, April 30. both gunboats and transports were ferrying over the 13th corps; our soldiers, so fast as landed, taking three days rations in their haversacks, and pushing out on the road to Port Gibson, followed by the 17th corps. Meantime, Gen. Sherman, with the 15th corps, had been left above Vicksburg, expecting to follow on the track of the 13th the 17th, until he received April 26. a letter from Gen. Grant, near Carthage, depicting the badness of the roads, and directing his to remain where he
fords to Chancellorsville. Resistance had been expected here; but none was encountered, as none worth mentioning had been above; and Couch crossed his corps April 30. at the United States ford on pontoons, without the loss of a man. Gen. Hooker, at Morrisville, superintended the movement; following himself to Chancellorsvilleon; when three pontoon bridges were laid in front of Sedgwick, and every thing made ready for crossing in force. Now Sickles's (3d) corps was ordered to move April 30. silently, rapidly to the United States ford, and thence to Chancellorsville, while part of the pontoons were taken up and sent to Banks's ford; Reynolds, after ent. B. Positions held by Rebel troops previous to the movement. C. Position taken and held by Union troops, April 29. D. Small force of Rebels routed. April 30. E. Farthest advance made by Union forces, May 1. F. Line which Union forces retired to and intrenched, May 1. G. Jackson's attack on the 11th corps, Ma
ith or interest in it till some time afterward. But Banks's official sanction was sufficient; so Bailey set to work, April 30. and soon had a main dam of timber and stone constructed across the channel of the river — here 758 feet wide, 4 to 6 de with reiterated orders from Grant to bring his Shreveport campaign to a close without delay. Banks sent Hunter back April 30. with dispatches, stating that the fleet was above the falls, and that it could not be left there to the enemy, nor yet ore the dams were completed and the gunboats relieved from their peril, Banks was favored with a fresh dispatch Dated April 30. from Halleck, saying: Lieut.-Gen. Grant directs that orders heretofore given be so modified that no troops be withdt rains, over horrible roads, with the Rebel cavalry busy on every side. At Jenkins's Ferry (crossing of the Saline) April 30. he was assailed in great force by the Rebels, now led by Kirby Smith in person. Our men had been working in mud and ra
can establish any thing, then this is proved a case of deliberate, wholesale massacre of prisoners of war after they had surrendered — many of them long after — and for the naked reason that some of them were Black, and others were fighting in Black company. Forrest retreated rapidly from the scene of this achievement into Mississippi, and was not effectively pursued; there being no adequate cavalry force at hand for the purpose. Gen. S. D. Sturgis, with 12,000 men, was sent after April 30. Forrest; advancing from Memphis to Bolivar; but of course did not come near him: in fact, there was no chance of over-taking him after he had passed Wolf river and the forces guarding our lines in that quarter. Some weeks later, a similar and in good part the same force, but including most of A. J. Smith's corps, now returned from the luckless Red river campaign, was sent from Memphis after Forrest, with instructions to push on till he was found and beaten, so as to prevent the transfer
y, but more especially those in Virginia. The plans of the superior were freely imparted to and discussed with his most trusted subordinate, ere they parted to enter respectively on their memorable campaigns against Richmond and Atlanta. Those campaigns were to be commenced simultaneously on the Rapidan and the Tennessee; and either movement to be pressed so vigorously, persistently, that neither of the Rebel main armies could spare troops to reenforce the other. When Sherman received April 30. his final instructions from Grant, it was settled that the campaign should open with May; and Gen. Sherman set forth May 6. accordingly from the Winter encampments of his forces around Chattanooga with an army barely short of 100,000 men Army of the Cumberland--Gen. Thomas: Infantry.Cavalry.Artillery.Total. 54,5683,8282,37760,773 Army of the Tennessee--Gen. McPherson: Infantry.Cavalry.Artillery.Total. 22,4376241,40424,465 Army of the Ohio--Gen. Schofield: Infantry.Cavalry.