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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 369 369 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 253 253 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 13 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for April 30th or search for April 30th in all documents.

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hom he himself designated as the finest army on this planet. His first step was a brilliant one, soon to be followed by defeat and disappointment. On April 29 and 30 an army of fifty thousand men, each bearing sixty pounds of baggage, marched twenty-seven miles, crossed two streams guarded by an enemy, and took up a strong position at Chancellorsville, Va. So sure was Hooker of his position that he announced in an official order (April 30), The enemy must either ingloriously fly or come out from behind his defences and give us battle on our own ground, where certain destruction awaits him. Official War Records, 39, p. 171. But the superior generalships of the 18th. Capts. George Bush and William Cordwell of the 13th had been killed by artillery fire at Fitzhugh's Crossing, being the only persons killed (April 29-30). Lieut. A. E. Phillips, 1st Mass. Cavalry, was mortally wounded at Rapidan Station (May 1). There fell also at Chancellorsville Lieut. Gerald Fitzgerald (2d), John