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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 369 369 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 253 253 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 13 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for April 30th or search for April 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
Point, but instead of attempting a sudden assault in that direction, McClellan had preferred to leave it for a few days on board the transports which had brought it over, in order that it might take advantage of the effect of the bombardment to ascend York River at the first signal. Everything was to be ready for the 5th of May; but the day before, at dawn, the Confederate army had disappeared: it had evacuated Yorktown during the night. This movement had been determined upon since the 30th of April, at a council of war held in Yorktown by Jefferson Davis, Lee, Johnston, and Magruder. The evacuation of Norfolk, which followed as a result, was to be effected at the same time. To ascertain the range of some one-hundred and two hundred pounders which had just been placed in position, a few projectiles had been thrown into Yorktown. The sight of the damage they had caused was a wholesome warning to the Confederate chiefs, who, knowing themselves to be on the eve of a bombardment, h
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
ide by the waters of the river, he placed a strong garrison in Huntsville, and proceeded to the north-east with his forces to seize Chattanooga, which was already considered a position of great importance; he intended at the same time to protect his communications, which were maintained by the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, and which parties of the enemy were menacing between Shelbyville and Stevenson, a point where this line connects with that of the Memphis and Charleston. On the 30th of April, he took possession at Bridgeport, near Stevenson, of the bridge, through which the two tracks, now consolidated into one, cross over to the left side of the Tennessee. It was an excellent position for beginning an offensive campaign, and a few reinforcements, detached from the grand army which was then at Pittsburg Landing, might probably have enabled him to strike some decisive blows. At the head of the cavalry, which Halleck kept inactive before Corinth, he could have crossed the Te
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
d to which it was expedient to shut one's eyes, from those that were calculated to bring disgrace upon the administration or some of its agents. Personal influence controlled the action of Congressmen too much to admit of any impartial discussion of these questions. This led occasionally to the adoption of imprudent resolutions. Thus Mr. Cameron, who was Secretary of War up to January 14th, and had then been succeeded by Mr. Stanton, was censured by the House of Representatives on the 30th of April for having, during the early part of his administration, authorized military expenses outside of the department, without requiring the usual vouchers. To this resolution Mr. Lincoln replied by a message, in which he stated that the departments were full of clerks who betrayed the government, that under such circumstances irregular means could alone accomplish the desired object, and emphatically asserted his responsibility for the acts of his agent. The matter was then dropped. We h