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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 162 162 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 119 119 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 25 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 23 23 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 18 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 17 17 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for May or search for May in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 8 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate invasion of New Mexico and Arizona. (search)
d off a great deal. There is nothing worth sending for in the shape of ammunition except the shell. The distance from Nugales to Rio Puerco is about 109 miles; road very bad. Sibley's command made it in five days. Left dead on the road about 60 or 70 mules and horses. Editors. who, with his company, followed them alone for a long distance, picking up a large amount of serviceable articles which they had abandoned on their way. Sibley himself arrived at Fort Bliss in the first week of May, while his command was strung out for fifty miles to the rear. He remained here but a few days, and upon hearing that the California column, under the command of Colonel James H. Carleton, was rapidly approaching from Southern California, he commenced his farther retreat for San Antonio, Texas. His force was entirely demoralized, and moved on its way without discipline or command, every man for himself, until all finally arrived. Sibley's command, when he reached Fort Bliss, in 1861, numbe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Early operations on the Potomac River. (search)
Officer Silas H. Stringham, and the Colorado, Mississippi, Powhatan, and Brooklyn in the Gulf, under Flag-Officer William Mervine, took the initial steps to render the blockade effective. Smaller vessels were sent to the blockading stations as rapidly as they could be prepared. The Potomac River, although officially within the limits of the Atlantic Squadron, became early in the war a nearly independent command, owing to its distance from the flag-ship, and its nearness to Washington. In May the Potomac flotilla was organized, under Commander James I. Ward. It was originally composed of the small side-wheel steamer Thomas Freeborn, purchased, May 7th, at New York, and the tugs Anacostia and Resolute, but was considerably enlarged in the course of the year. Its organization was closely connected with the service of the Washington Navy Yard, and other vessels attached to the yard occasionally cooperated with it. Its movements were under the direct supervision of the department.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
's heels, when he made his inevitable return march to join the main Confederate Army and attack our right flank. The failure of McDowell to reach me at or before the critical moment was due to the orders he received from Washington. The bridges over the Chickahominy first built were swept away by the floods, and it became necessary to construct others Section of the encampment of the Army of the Potomac near White House, Va. Process Reproduction of a photograph. we were now [middle of May] encamped [near White House] on the old Custis place, at present owned by General Fitzhugh Lee of the rebel cavalry service. On every side of us were immense fields of wheat, which, but for the presence of armies, promised an abundant harvest. . . . it was marvelous that such quiet could exist where a hundred thousand men were crowded together, yet almost absolute stillness reigned throughout the vast camp during the whole of this pleasant Sabbath.--from George T. Stevens's Three years in th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
n an aggregate force of from 13,000 to 15,000 men to open his campaign with. At the beginning of May the situation was broadly about as follows: Milroy, with about 4087 men, was on the Staunton and reased to 7000 men, sent from Washington and other points north of the Potomac, before the end of May, Jackson had about 80,000 men to take into account (including all Union forces north of the Rappas seems to us an overestimate of the Union forces actually in the Valley during the operations of May and June. April 30th, Banks had 9178 present for duty ; May 31st, Fremont had 14,672 (Cox and Kewere not engaged.--Editors. of these enemies were in the Valley under their various commanders in May and June [see p. 299]. Besides Ewell's division already mentioned, General Johnston could giveon of the best-armed and best-equipped men ever put into the field by any government. Early in May, Jackson was near Port Republic contemplating his surroundings and maturing his plans. What thes
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Richmond scenes in 1862. (search)
in the old service of the United States, as in that of the Confederacy, it was said, He was a spotless knight. Spite of its melancholy uses, there was no more favorite walk in Richmond than Hollywood, a picturesquely beautiful spot, where high hills sink into velvet undulations, profusely shaded with holly, pine, and cedar, as well as by trees of deciduous foliage. In spring the banks of the stream that runs through the valley were enameled with wild flowers, and the thickets were full of May-blossom and dogwood. Mounting to the summit of the bluff, one may sit under the shade of some ample oak, to view the spires and roofs of the town, with the white colonnade of the distant Capitol. Richmond, thus seen beneath her verdant foliage upon hills, girdled by hills, confirms what an old writer felt called to exclaim about it, Verily, this city hath a pleasant seat. On the right, below this point, flows the rushing yellow river, making ceaseless turmoil around islets of rock whose ri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The finding of Lee's lost order. (search)
tive point of each corps. Within an hour after finding the dispatch, General McClellan's whole army was on the move, and the enemy were overtaken next day, the 14th, at South Mountain, and the battle of that name was fought. During the night of the 14th General Lee's army fell back toward the Potomac River, General McClellan following the next day. On the 16th they were overtaken again, and the battle of Antietam. was fought mainly on the 17th. General D. H. Hill says in his article in the May Century, that the battle of South Mountain was fought in order to give General Lee time to move his trains, which were then parked in the neighborhood of Boonsboro‘. It is evident from General Lee's movements from the time he left Frederick City, that he intended to recross the Potomac without hazarding a battle in Maryland, and had it not been for the finding of this lost order, the battle of South Mountain, and probably that of Antietam, would not have been fought. For confirmation of th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
ille and Chattanooga railroad in the vicinity of Manchester. Toward the last of May quite a large expedition was organized, to which the dispatches ascribe differen cautiously, and intrenching every time that he halted, Halleck by the middle of May approached within four miles of Corinth, some twenty miles from the Tennessee. 93. Third division, Brig.-Gen. C. S. Hamilton. Staffloss: w, 2. Escort: C, 5th Mo. Cav., Capt. Albert Borcherdt (w). Loss: k, 1; w, 2 = 3. First Brigade, Col. Ark.,----; 2d Mo., Col. Francis M. Cockrell; 3d Mo., Col. James A. Pritchard; 5th Mo.,----; 1st Mo. (dismounted cavalry), Lieut.-Col. W. D. Maupin; Mo. Battery, Cap8; m, 26 = 322. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Hamilton. Escort: C, 5th Mo. Cavalry. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Napoleon B. Buford: 48th Ind., Lieut. Co.,----; 2d Mo., Col. Francis M. Cockrell; 3d Mo., Col. James A. Pritchard (w); 5th Mo.,----; 1st Mo. Cav. (dismounted), Lieut.-Col. W. D. Maupin; Mo. Battery, Captai
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
8th Wis., Lieut.-Col. George W. Robbins (w), Maj. John W. Jefferson (w), Capt. William B. Britton; 2d Iowa Battery, Capt. Nelson T. Spoor. Brigade loss: k, 48; w, 248; m, 26 = 322. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Hamilton. Escort: C, 5th Mo. Cavalry. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Napoleon B. Buford: 48th Ind., Lieut. Col. De Witt C. Rugg (w), Lieut. James W. Archer; 59th Ind., Col. Jesse I. Alexander; 5th Iowa, Col. Charles L. Matthies; 4th Minn., Col. John B. Sanborn; 26th Mo., Lieuor Army of the West.--Major-General Sterling Price. first division, Brig.-Gen. Louis Hebert, Brig.-Gen. Martin E. Green. First Brigade, Col. Elijah Gates: 16th Ark.,----; 2d Mo., Col. Francis M. Cockrell; 3d Mo., Col. James A. Pritchard (w); 5th Mo.,----; 1st Mo. Cav. (dismounted), Lieut.-Col. W. D. Maupin; Mo. Battery, Captain William Wade. Brigade loss: k, 53; w, 332; m, 92 = 477. Second Brigade, Col. W. Bruce Colbert: 14th Ark.,----; 17th Ark., Lieut.-Col. John Griffith; 3d La.,----; 40