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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 162 162 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 119 119 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 25 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 23 23 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 18 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 17 17 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May or search for May in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

directed all his energies to strengthen the works so as to resist any assault till reinforcements arrived from Newbern, to raise the siege there. No report of the losses on either side. An expedition sent against a rebel camp at Gum Swamp, in May, which captured one hundred and sixty-five prisoners and military stores, and another, in July, against Rocky Mount, on Tar River, which destroyed the bridge at that place and a large amount of rebel property, terminate the military operations in e army of the Potomac there are thirty-six regiments of cavalry, averaging for the last six months from ten thousand to fourteen thousand men present for duty. The issues of cavalry horses to this army for the same period have been as follows: In May, five thousand six hundred and seventy-three; June, six thousand three hundred and twenty-seven; July, four thousand seven hundred and sixteen; August, five thousand four hundred and ninety-nine; September, five thousand eight hundred and twenty-s
y loan, with a pledge of a small export duty on cotton, to provide for the redemption of the debt. At its second session, war was declared to exist between the Confederacy and the United States, and provision was made for the issue of twenty millions of dollars in treasury notes, and for borrowing thirty millions of dollars on bonds. The tariff was revised, and preparatory measures taken to enable the Congress to levy internal taxation at its succeeding session. These laws were passed in May, and the States of Virginia, North-Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, having joined the Confederacy, the Congress adjourned to meet in the city of Richmond in the following month of July. Prior to the assembling of your predecessors in Richmond, at their third session, near the end of July, 1861, the President of the United States had developed, in his message, the purpose to make the contest a short and decisive one, and had called on Congress for four hundred thousand men, and four hundr
eneral Banks's assistance, who, it appears, had predetermined on scattering or demolishing the forces in West-Louisiana. It is altogether probable that something in the seasons had dictated this choice to General Banks. For example, the Red River is only high enough to be navigable by the largest vessels during this month and the next, while the task of taking Mobile is one which might be undertaken at any time, though it is unaccountably strange that it was not begun in December instead of May. As is well known, the column under General Franklin crossed from New-Orleans to Brashear City about the first instant, and thence took up the line of march along the Bayou Teche, substantially the same route pursued nearly a year ago, via Opelousas to, Alexandria. The forces under General A. J. Smith, from the department of the Tennessee, comprising the brigades under Generals F. K. Smith, Thomas, and Ellet, embarked at Vicksburgh on the tenth, and proceeded down to the mouth of Red Rive
e hundred men. There is a sufficient quantity of salt furnished, and a very small quantity of vinegar. I will here remark that in a few instances, say six or eight times at most, a small quantity of sweet potatoes has been issued instead of the rations of meat. The above is the sum total of the rations issued to our officers and men now prisoners of war. The condition of our unfortunate enlisted men, now in the hands of the enemy, is much worse than that of the officers. From early in May last, when I arrived in Richmond, to about the first of December, all the enlisted men were taken to what is called Belle Island, and turned into an inclosure, like so many cattle in a slaughter-pen. Very few of them had tents, or shelter of any kind, and the few tents furnished were so poor and leaky as to render them but little better than none. All the prisoners are taken to Libby when they first arrive in Richmond, for the purpose of counting them and enrolling their names; consequent