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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
ld break in all its fury upon us, we worshipped God. A correspondent of the Central Presbyterian expresses the opinion that every Southern Sabbath-school has one living representative at least in this war, and that most schools have many. A minister thus writes to the Religious Herald: Brother Editors: For the encouragement of fathers and other friends of our soldiers, I send you the following for the Herald: My son, a young man of less than twenty years of age, left home early in May with his company of volunteers for the seat of war. When he left he was a stranger to God's forgiving grace, and so far as I know, was not seriously concerned about his condition. I determined to follow him with my prayers, if haply the Lord might have mercy upon him. I asked three beloved brother-ministers to pray for him. I also put the New Testament into his hand, with the request that he would read it carefully and prayerfully. He made no promise, but I felt sure he would comply with my
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 6: hospital work. (search)
But is not this true of our work in the pastorate? Is it not true of the expenditure of ammunition in a battle? Ordinarily, a man's weight in lead is expended for every one that is killed. I have not told the half that I designed when I began, but thinking only short pieces appropriate for the Herald, in its present limited dimensions, I close. Yours truly, Geo. B. Taylor. Staunton, February 24, 1863. Huguenot Springs hospital, June 8th. Messrs. Editors: On the third Sabbath in May we commenced a series of meetings at this hospital, which continued till the first Sabbath of June. The Lord's blessing rested upon the meeting, from twenty-five to thirty making a public profession of faith in Christ. Fifteen have been baptized, and others are awaiting the Ordinance. . . G. W. Hyde, Chaplain of the Post. Last week, while in Lynchburg, I had the pleasure of seeing from fifteen to twenty soldiers present themselves for prayer and religious instruction. Rev. Jno. L. J
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
in command. It was the first regiment from Tennessee to go to Virginia early in May. Many of the soldiers of that gallant command were from the counties where I haand I had the privilege of visiting their camps and preaching to the soldiers in May and June, till they were ordered to Kentucky. In July, 1861, I entered the armys indicated that there should be. General Vance was quite sick in Shelbyville in May. He was attended by his faithful wife. May 11. Attended the funeral of Dr. nnessee encamped around Dalton, Georgia, the entire winter of 1863-64, and until May, in the spring—over five months. The post quartermaster furnished me with room N who wished to write. I had no lack of company day nor night from December till May. How earnest and eager the preachers were to secure religious reading of all kidiers' Tract Association Methodist Church, South. Dear Brother: The month of May has been less favorable for distributing religious reading than the several mont