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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12., The first Methodist Episcopal Church of Medford. (search)
905. The society was connected with the First Methodist Church in Charlestown until 1831, when it became a station, and Rev. Apollas Hale was appointed pastor. From 1833 to 1839, the pulpit was again supplied by local preachers, until most of the members moved away and the society grew so small that preaching services were suspended for a time. In February, 1842, Ira T. Barker of Medford was converted and joined the High street (now Trinity) Methodist Episcopal Church in Charlestown. In May of the same year he opened his home for public worship. A class was formed at his house and weekly prayer-meetings established. During the year a schoolhouse on Cross street was secured, fitted up as a chapel and dedicated by Rev. Moses L. Scudder, the Charlestown pastor. Prayer and class meetings were moved to the chapel, and preaching services were held occasionally by Brother Scudder until the fall of 1843, when Rev. Joseph Whitman of Malden and Rev. George Landon, pastor at North Russe
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12., The first Parish in Medford. (search)
ift of events in many an ancient parish, the word was known to be a mild way of saying he was a Unitarian. It was because this was understood that there was so strong a minority against him in the vote that elected him as pastor. Of this he was fully informed, which leads him to say in his acceptance of the call in a letter to the town, After a painful view of the subject, and a strong internal conflict my conclusion is to accept the invitation. In the time that elapsed between his call in May and his installation in July, there was sufficient opportunity in a small community, which Medford then was, for a pretty full expression of opinion, for which small communities have a special aptitude. Mr. Bigelow was cognizant of this; the diminished attendance at church after his call clearly indicating that something would happen. How well he knew it is evidenced by a quaint letter written Monday, July 14, 1823, after his first Sunday as pastor. A copy of this letter is preserved by th