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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 780 780 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 29 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 29 29 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 28 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 23 23 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 18 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May 1st or search for May 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
series of fights from the time that Grant crossed the river until the surrender of Vicksburg was a fatal blunder, no matter who it was planned by or who sanctioned it. Concentration at the point of Grant's crossing, and defeat to him there, or, if that was impossible, concentration in the interior, and a fight before he captured the Jackson and Vicksburg railroad, was the thing to have placed him at his worst advantage both with regard to his supplies and reinforcements. The action of May 1st was only a skirmish instead of being a vital fight, and all subsequent management being based on the protection of Vicksburg partook of the same error of judgment that led to the battles of Edwards Station or Champion Hills, Big Black, and the sufferings of Vicksburg. Editorial Paragraphs. General Fitzhugh Lee's Second tour in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. On the 19th of February last the Secretary left Richmond at 8 A. M., joined General Fitzhugh Lee at Charlottesvi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
duty of checking Grant, tried to keep the Federal army back. If common discretion had been exercised, the responsibility and the evils of the catastrophe that fell upon Pemberton afterward would have been averted. The whole series of fights from the time that Grant crossed the river until the surrender of Vicksburg was a fatal blunder, no matter who it was planned by or who sanctioned it. Concentration at the point of Grant's crossing, and defeat to him there, or, if that was impossible, concentration in the interior, and a fight before he captured the Jackson and Vicksburg railroad, was the thing to have placed him at his worst advantage both with regard to his supplies and reinforcements. The action of May 1st was only a skirmish instead of being a vital fight, and all subsequent management being based on the protection of Vicksburg partook of the same error of judgment that led to the battles of Edwards Station or Champion Hills, Big Black, and the sufferings of Vicksburg.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
, Memphis and back home by the Memphis and Charleston, East Tennessee and Georgia, Norfolk and Western, and Richmond and Danville railroads, we met with no accident, suffered no serious detention, encountered nothing but politeness on the part of railroad officials, and had all of the comforts attainable on such a journey. crowded out explains the absence of several articles intended for this number. Several of the articles left with the printer when the Secretary started to Texas the 1st of May, greatly exceeded anticipated length, and left no room for a number of others; but we expect to have out our July number by the 20th of June, and the omitted articles will have an early chance. J. L. McCOWN, Dallas, Texas; will receive our thanks for a very accurate and beautifully-executed photograph of General Fitzhugh Lee, taken when we were there in March. Mr. McCown is an old Lexington (Va.) man, having learned his art with Miley; and we prize his work all the more because he was a