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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 780 780 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 29 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 29 29 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 28 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 23 23 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 18 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May 1st or search for May 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
nch at Clinton. Our camp is on a green side and we have christened it Botetourt. It seems there didn't any of us have measles and mumps when we were children. Marching nearly all night-very dark, drenching rain. The company in fine spirits. May 1st. Camped in orchard at lower end of Powell's Valley. Stayed in the valley, guarding the gaps in the Cumberland Mountain until the 7th of June. Left Powell's Valley (without any regrets) to reinforce General Leadbetter at Chattanooga. On the te crossed the river in the day and night of the 30th of April, and had at once moved forward. There ensued the battle of Port Gibson, a battle of five to one, fought with determination from dawn till dusk. At 2 o'clock in the morning of the first of May, the pickets began firing. On the extreme left, commanded by General Green, of Missouri, the artillery of both sides became engaged. The firing was incessant and deadly. Says General Green's report: The enemy pressing heavily upon me, I sen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
amp on Jimtown Road, eight miles from Monticello: As previously reported, the enemy crossed the Cumberland in force yesterday at two points. We skirmished with them until dark last night; lost no men except four sick and four pickets. I will fall back to a point near Albany where they cannot flank me from Burkesville, as I learn from Colonel Morrison that there was heavy cannonading at Celina on the 25th. He is still at Albany. Major R. S. Bulloch is with me, with Cluke's Regiment. On May 1 Colonel Chenault sent two dispatches to General Morgan, who was then at Sparta, Tenn. The first was from Monticello: The enemy are on this side of the river, and pressing hard upon me—three regiments of infantry and one of cavalry. Without help I shall not be able to hold this point long. I have written to Colonel Morrison for reinforcements. Do not know whether I will get them or not. I have only about 600 men and Colonel Scott's two bull pups. The second dispatch was from twelve miles