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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 3rd or search for May 3rd in all documents.

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Doc. 2.-the returned prisoners. In the Senate of the United States. May 9, 1864. Mr. Wade submitted the following report. The Joint Committee on the conduct and expenditures of the war submitted the following report, with the accompanying testimony. On the fourth instant your Committee received a communication of that date from the Secretary of War, inclosing the report of Colonel Hoffman, Commissary General of prisoners, dated May third, calling the attention of the Committee to the condition of returned Union prisoners, with the request that the Committee would immediately proceed to Annapolis and examine with their own eyes the condition of those who have been returned from rebel captivity. The Committee resolved that they would comply with the request of the Secretary of War on the first opportunity. The fifth of May was devoted by the Committee to concluding their labors upon the investigation of the Fort Pillow massacre. On the sixth of May, however, the Committ
the Rappahannock and the Rapidan above their junction, and took position at Chancellorsville, at the same time General Sedgwick crossed near Fredericksburgh, and stormed and carried the heights. A severe battle took place on the second and third of May, and on the fifth our army was again withdrawn to the north side of the river. For want of official data, I am unable to give any detailed accounts of these operations or of our losses. It is also proper to remark in this place, that from r running the enemy's batteries, the operations were completely successful. The army crossed the river at Bruinsburgh. April thirtieth, turned Grand Gulf, and engaged the enemy near Port Gibson on the first, and at Fourteen Mile Creek on the third of May. The enemy was defeated in both engagements, with heavy loss. General Grant now moved his forces, by rapid marches, to the north, in order to separate the garrison of Vicksburgh from the covering arm of Johnston. This movement was followe
llogg, House Committee on Military Affairs: dear sir: Agreeably to your request, I have the honor to report the following facts in relation to the treatment of our officers and men by the rebel authorities. It is impossible for me to give you an account of all the acts of barbarity, inhumanity, and bad faith I have witnessed during my captivity, but I will endeavor to mention such instances as will give you as correct an idea of the true condition of our men as possible. On the third day of May last, near Rome, Georgia, my command having become so reduced by hard fighting and marching, during the seven days previous, that it was evident to me that we (about one thousand five hundred officers and men) would fall into the hands of the enemy, and, after holding a council of war with my regimental commanders, it was decided to capitulate, and thus secure the best terms possible for the command as a condition of surrender. In accordance with this decision I met the rebel commander