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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 746 746 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 27 27 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 13 13 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May 4th or search for May 4th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
killed, wounded and missing. Thirteen were killed outright and eighty-seven wounded severely. The brigade lost five field officers. Lieutenant-Colonel A. M. Gordon, brother of General J. B. Gordon, was killed. He was an accomplished gentleman, a fine officer and a true Christian. After being shot, he coolly said he was willing to die for the cause. Fighting Joe's army was terribly repulsed and forced to retire beyond the Rappahannock. The wagon train was moved back to Guinea's. May 4. Our wagons were massed and our teamsters, wagon masters and quartermasters and their sergeants were armed with guns, and placed under my command to be in readiness for the enemy's cavalry. There were ninety men in all, and I proposed to resist to the death, if attacked. There were a good many trembling men in the party, who were not over anxious for an encounter. The enemy's cavalry contented itself with tearing up a part of the railroad track and cutting telegraph wires, thus interrupt