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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 952 952 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 65 65 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 33 33 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 18 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 17 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 5th or search for May 5th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

national account. Hatteras inlet, N. C., May 18, 1864. I venture to submit the following account of one of the most unusual and remarkable naval conflicts of this or any other war, in which the contending forces were so markedly disproportionate, and the result so contrary to preconceived ideas of iron-clad invincibility, that it may justly claim to take a historical position on the same page that records the brilliant exploits of Decatur and John Paul Jones. On the afternoon of May fifth, the Mattabesett, Sassacus, and Wyalusing, side-wheel gunboats, were lying at anchor in Albemarle Sound, twenty miles below the mouth of the Roanoke River, having been assigned the arduous duty of encountering, and, if possible, destroying the rebel iron-clad ram Albemarle, whose recent raid, in conjunction with the attack and capture of Plymouth, when she succeeded in capturing two of our gunboats, and sustained unharmed the repeated broadsides of the Miami, directed by the brave and lame
ed River. On the second of May we established communication with Admiral Farragut at the mouth of Red River, through the Atchafalaya, by the gunboat Arizona, Captain Upton commanding, accompanied by Captain R. T. Dunham, of my staff. The fifth of May, our headquarters at Opelousas were broken up, and the troops moved for Alexandria, a distance of from ninety to one hundred miles, making this march in three days and four hours. Moving rapidly to the rear of Fort De Russey, a strong work on that position. On reaching Alexandria, I received two despatches from General Grant, one dated the twenty-third of April, stating that he could spare us a reinforcement of twenty thousand men if we could supply them; and the other, dated the fifth of May, proposing to send one army corps to Bayou Sara by the twenty-fifth of May, and asking that I should then send all the troops I could spare to Vicksburg, after the reduction of Port Hudson. To both of these plans I consented, and answered, th