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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 564 564 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 38 38 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 33 33 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 26 26 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for May 6th or search for May 6th in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 21 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
y-first Ohio Infantry, of operations August 9-September 8. No. 67Lieut. Col. Daniel Bowman, Ninety-third Ohio Infantry. No. 68Col. Oliver H. Payne, One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio Infantry, including operations of Ninety-third Ohio Infantry, May 6-August 19. No. 69Col. Frederick Knefler, Seventy-ninth Indiana Infantry, commanding Third Brigade. No. 70Capt. Eli F. Ritter, Seventy-ninth Indiana Infantry. No. 71Col. George F. Dick, Eighty-sixth Indiana Infantry. No. 72Lieut. Col. Chesley No. 85Capt. Cullen Bradley, Sixth Ohio Battery. No. 86Capt. Jacob Ziegler, Battery B, Pennsylvania Light Artillery. No. 87Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations May 30, and itinerary of the corps May 6-September 8. No. 88Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 7. No. 89Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 22-September 8.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ar Chattanooga by May 5, according to the programme of Lieutenant-General Grant, I repaired to Chattanooga in person on the 29th of April, and remained there until May 6, by which date General Thomas had grouped his army at and about Ringgold, General Schofield his at and near Cleveland, and General McPherson at and near Gordon's Mills on the Chickamauga. May 6, all the armies moved forward, General Thomas on Tunnel Hill, a gravelly range of hills covering the mouth of the famous Buzzard Roost Pass through Rocky Face Ridge; General Schofield along the east of that range approaching Dalton from the north, and General Mc- Pherson aiming for Resaca, eighte the number of men joining from furlough and hospitals about compensating for the loss in battle and from sickness. These armies were grouped on the morning of May 6 as follows: That of the Cumberland at and near Ringgold; that of the Tennessee at Gordon's Mills, on the Chickamauga; and that of the Ohio near Red Clay, on the Ge
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
ctfully submitted. John Newton, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, In the Field, July 21, 1864. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., September-, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to forward the following report of the operations of the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, during the present campaign: Tuesday, May 3, the division marched from Cleveland to Red Clay. May 4, marched from Red Clay to Catoosa Springs. May 5 and 6, remained at Catoosa Springs in position. May 7, marched from Catoosa Springs to Tunnel Hill, this division following a road on the left flank of that pursued by the other divisions of the corps, and took position on that road until relieved by the Twenty-third Corps; after this followed the First and Third Divisions to the neighborhood of Tunnel Hill, where it was posted in reserve. Sunday, May 8, Harker's brigade was ordered to ascend to the northern extremity of Rocky Face Ridge, the One
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
No. 47. report of Maj. Frederick A. Atwater, Forty-second Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Forty-Second Illinois Vet. Vol. Infty., Near Atlanta, Ga., August 12, 1864. Sir: In regard to the operations of the Forty-second Illinois Infantry, I beg leave to report as follows: The regiment, under command of Lieut. Col. E. D. Swain, rejoined the brigade on the 6th of May last, after marching from Nashville. Tenn., on its return from veteran furlough, and reported for duty to General C. G. Harker, then commanding the brigade. On the following morning we resumed our march and entered upon a very eventful campaign, known as The Georgia campaign of 1864. When we rejoined the brigade we numbered 20 commissioned officers and 238 enlisted men. On the 8th of May we skirmished a part of the day and participated in the capture of Rocky Face Ridge, and went on picket in the evening, and were not relieved in time the next day to take part in the bloody and unsuccessful assault upon the enemy'
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 55 (search)
Dalton, Ga., with an aggregate of 500 officers and men, fully equipped for an active campaign. We bivouacked at 7.30 p. m. after a march of about fourteen miles. May 4, the march was resumed at 6 a. m. As we were near the enemy the march was slow. Halted at about seven miles from Tunnel Hill and commenced throwing up works, but after dusk we changed positions and occupied a ridge that led down to Catoosa Springs. May 5 was spent in throwing up defensive works along the crest of the ridge. May 6, we received orders to be ready to move at any time. 7th, marched at 5.30 a. m., and at 2 p. m. arrived at Tunnel Hill. 8th, at daylight I reported to brigade headquarters, when General Harker showed me a map of the surrounding country, gave me a guide, and desired me to effect a lodgment on Rocky Face Ridge with my regiment, and he would support me with the remainder of the brigade. This ridge runs north and south and is exceedingly abrupt, especially the western side of it. Huge bowlders
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
esulted most gloriously to our arms in the capture of Atlanta. At 12 m. on the 3d of May ultimo the division broke up its encampment at McDonald's Station, near Cleveland, on the East Tennessee railroad, and marched southward toward Catoosa Springs. On the 4th of May the divisions of the Fourth Corps were concentrated at the Springs. As the troops approached the Springs a light party of hostile cavalry was encountered, but it fled immediately before the onward movement. May the 5th and 6th the division,with the other divisions, remained in camp. May the 7th the onward movement was resumed, the First Division of the corps leading. A few hours' march led to Tunnel Hill. This is a strong position, and it had been supposed the enemy might attempt a serious opposition to our farther progress; but it was found to be occupied only by cavalry, which was quickly driven off by the light troops of the First Division. The hill was soon occupied by the First and Third Divisions, the for
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
, Ga., on the evening of the 4th instant, embracing a period of 123 days, and resulting in the constant defeat and pressing back of the rebel army-first under General J. E. Johnston, then General Hood--from Tunnel Hill, a distance of 150 miles, and the occupation of Atlanta, with the intervening country, by the U. S. forces: This brigade at 12 m. on the 3d day of May moved with the division, on a road leading through Catoosa Springs, to Tunnel Hill, which point was reached about 12 m. of May 6, where the enemy was met in force, occupying a strong position on and about Rocky Face Ridge. On the morning of May 7 the brigade was put in position about 300 yards to the left of the railroad and formed in two lines, with the Fifteenth Wisconsin Infantry deployed as skirmishers. The brigade was then moved forward down the hill across an open field and into the woods close to the foot of the ridge, the skirmishers meeting with stubborn resistance, but steadily pressing forward close up t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 69 (search)
No. 65. report of Lieut. Col. Robert L. Kimberly, Forty-first Ohio Infantry, commanding regiment and demi-brigade. Hdqrs. Forty-First Regt. Ohio Veteran Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the Forty-first Regiment Ohio Veteran Infantry during the campaign just closed. I have also to include the services of the First Ohio Volunteer Infantry from the 6th of May to the 21st of July, during which time that regiment was consolidated with my own under my command: At 12 m. May 3 the battalion broke camp at McDonald's Station, Tenn., and marched for Catoosa Springs, reaching that place on the 4th. On the morning of the 9th. the command having moved upon the enemy's position at Buzzard Roost, a picket detail of four companies of the Forty-first Regiment became engaged with the enemy's skirmishers, but without casualty. At 3 p. m. of the same day the battalion in moving across an open field in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 72 (search)
No. 68. report of Col. Oliver H. Payne, one hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio Infantry, including operations of Ninety-third Ohio Infantry, May 6-August 19. Hdqrs. 124TH regiment Ohio Vol. Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 13, 1864. Captain: I would respectfully submit the following report of the part taken by the One hundred and twenty-fourth Regiment Ohio Foot Volunteers in the campaign just closed, and would also include the Ninety-third Ohio Foot Volunteers, from May 6 to August 19,May 6 to August 19, it being placed during that time under my command by the general commanding the brigade: The battalion on the 3d of May, after a short rest of but two weeks from a hard and continuous campaign in East Tennessee, broke camp at McDonald's Station and marched to Catoosa Springs, reaching the Springs on the 4th. On the 9th, the command having moved up and confronted the enemy's position at Buzzard Roost, this battalion forming the front of the right line, with the Twenty-third Kentucky deploy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
hio Light Battery, Lieut. O. H. P. Ayres commanding; Capt. Cullen Bradley, Sixth Ohio Light Battery, chief of artillery. On May 3 the batteries moved with their respective divisions, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, marched via Red Clay to Catoosa Springs. Bridges' Battery and Sixth Ohio Light Battery marched via Ooltewah to Catoosa Springs. Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, joined the Second Division for duty May 6. On May 7 the batteries marched with their respective divisions to Tunnel Hill, the Fifth Indiana being the only battery engaged on that day. May 8, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries shelled the enemy upon Rocky Face Ridge. May 9, the Fifth Indiana, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania, and Bridges' Battery were placed in position on a small ridge between Tunnel Hill and Rocky Face Ridge, and engaged the enemy's batteries and lines, silencing his batteries. On the same day Bat
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