Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 6th or search for May 6th in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
, or even historians can take the views you express in relation to the part in the memorable fight in the Mississippi in 1862. I have just re-read my report of May 6th, and your two reports following, and cannot conceive how you could be more prominently mentioned to the Department. In the former, you are reported as leading rs under my immediate command, and to myself, and I appeal to your sense of justice whether I could do less. You state, I have just re-read my (your) report of May 6th, and your (my) two reports following, and cannot conceive how you could be more prominently mentioned to the Department. In the former, you are reported as leadiect of my addressing you. It is not to complain that you have not mentioned me prominently in your dispatch, but it is because in your report of the battle, dated May 6th, and the accompanying diagram, you do not give the circumstances of the fight as they occurred, but those which would apply to your former plan which was abandone
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
oals. The Cape Fear River had (since the complete blockade of Charleston) become the principal ground for blockade-runners, that river having two entrances, by either of which blockade-runners could enter, protected by Fort Caswell on the south side of Cape Fear, and by strong earth-works (which finally grew to be Fort Fisher) on the north side. Many reports are made of the capture or destruction of blockade-runners, and in chasing up these vessels great activity was displayed. On the 6th of May, Lieutenant-Commander Braine reports a boat expedition from the steamer Monticello and the mortar schooner Matthew Vassar (Acting-Master L. A. Brown), mentioning the destruction of one of the vessels in Morrell's Inlet, an English schooner called the Golden Liner, of Halifax, with a large cargo, and also the burning of two large store-houses. Destruction of this kind of property always caused serious loss to the enemy, and it could not be replaced. On May 26th, Rear-Admiral Lee reports
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
c as the Alabama, for in the space of five months she captured but fifteen vessels, which were all destroyed in the usual style of the Confederate cruisers. Her cruising-ground extended from the latitude of New York to the southward of Bahia, in Brazil. In the vicinity of Fernando Noronha, Maffitt picked up a vessel called the Lapwing, loaded with coal, and, by converting her into a tender, was enabled to supply himself with fuel as long as he wished to remain on the station. On the 6th of May the brig Clarence was captured off the coast of Brazil, armed by Maffitt with some light guns, and placed in command of Lieutenant Charles W. Read, formerly a midshipman in the U. S. Navy--and another Confederate State's vessel-of-war was created in the shortest possible time, with orders to burn, sink and destroy; although it was doubtful if Maffitt's authority to commission vessels would have been recognized in case he should have fallen in with a superior force. Lieutenant Read was b