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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,054 1,054 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 27 27 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 20 20 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 17 17 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 16 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909. You can also browse the collection for May 8th or search for May 8th in all documents.

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Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909, Company E, 39th Massachusetts Infantry, in the Civil War.—(Iv.) (search)
southwest and to our left), a distance of five or six miles, to the Yellow Tavern, or Six-Mile House. Here we found the Rebel pickets, and drove them before us. General Crawford's Division, to which our regiment belonged, After Spottsylvania, May 8 to 20, our brigade was commanded by General Crawford, as General Robinson, our division commander, lost a leg at that time and was obliged to leave the front. General Crawford was the physician at Fort Sumter when it was taken in 1861. formed a t as we stood up. Colonel C. L. Pierson was already badly wounded in the bowels by a minie ball. He was able to stand long enough to give the command, and then fell. General Pierson is still living in Beverly. He was shot three times, on May 8, May 10, and August 18. After the first wound he was back in the fight in less than two hours; after the second, caused by a shell cutting across his breast, he was sent home. The third wound was a terrible one in the lower bowels and his life was l