hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 458 458 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 70 70 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 37 37 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 9th or search for May 9th in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

him with a copy of the joint resolutions adopted by that body on the 2d of May, presented their report.--(Doc. 135.) The town of Dorchester, Mass., voted $20,000 for the war, besides appropriating $20 per month to every married volunteer, and $15 to every single volunteer. This applies not only to citizens of Dorchester who enlist in the town or out, but to citizens of other towns who may enlist in Dorchester, provided their own towns do not make any provision for them.--N. Y. Express, May 9. General John A. Dix, late Secretary of the Treasury, was appointed one of the four majorgenerals from the State of New York. General Dix is a native of New Hampshire, and is a son of the late Lieut.-Colonel Timothy Dix. He entered the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1812; was promoted ensign in 1814, and was subsequently promoted to a third lieutenancy in the twenty-first regiment of infantry. His subsequent rank of promotion is as follows: Second lieutenant, March
arlet braid, and red fatigue caps.--National Intelligencer, May 11. A privateer was captured at the mouth of the Chesapeake, by the steamer Harriet Lane. The officers and crew, with the exception of two seamen, escaped.--Philadelphia Press, May 9. The Richmond Examiner of to-day demands a Dictator; it says: No power in executive hands can be too great, no discretion too absolute, at such moments as these. We need a Dictator. Let lawyers talk when the world has time to hear them. NoSnyder, Allabaugh, Amey, Brooke, Cooke, and Taylor. The regiment numbers about 900, and comprises a fine body of hardy yeomanry and artisans, who left their fields and shops to rally in defence of the National Capital.--National Intelligencer, May 9. The steam frigate Minnesota, the flag-ship of the blockading squadron, sailed from Boston, Mass.--Boston Transcript, May 8. A meeting in aid of the volunteers from Roxbury, Mass., was held in that city. Speeches were made by Rev. J. E
May 9. At 3 o'clock this afternoon the steamer Maryland, with other transports, arrived at Baltimore with 1,300 troops from Perryville. They consist of five companies of the 3d Infantry, regulars, Major Shepherd, 420 men; one company of Sherman's Battery of Light Artillery, with 6 pieces of cannon and 70 horses, under Major Sherman; and the 1st Regiment, ten companies, of Pennsylvania Artillery, Col. Patterson, armed with muskets, and numbering 800 men. They were landed at Locust Point, one of the termini of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, within half a mile of Fort McHenry, and there transferred on board of two trains of cars, which departed immediately. Two hundred men were left to take charge of the horses, provisions and baggage, and these were to be forwarded at a later hour. The Mayor and Police Commissioners, with two hundred police, crossed in a ferry-boat to Locust Point, and were present at the debarkation. The Harriet Lane stood off the point with her ports
lty. The prisoners were defiant in their remarks, saying that they owed allegiance to the United States alone, etc. All three of them are Virginians by birth.--Richmond Dispatch, April 22. Gen. Milroy, at the head of a reconnoitring force, overtook the rear-guard of the rebel cavalry six miles west of the railroad, near Buffalo Gap, Augusta County, Western Virginia. They fled, rapidly pursued by the Nationals. Milroy learned that their main body stopped the previous night six miles beyond Buffalo Gap, but finding they were cut off at Staunton by Gen. Banks, they bore south-west, through both Bath and Alleghany Counties, toward the James River. A company that was sent by General Milroy down the north fork of the Potomac, in Pendleton County, captured eight rebels, including Barnett, a notorious guerrilla.--New York Commercial, April 25. The ship R. C. Files was captured by the National fleet, while attempting to run the blockade of Mobile, Ala.--New York Tribune, May 9.
volunteers; Lieut. Lombard, Battalion Adjutant Eighth Illinois cavalry, and Assist. Surg. Williams, First New York artillery, were, by the order of President Lincoln, struck from the roll of the army, for being captured while straggling, without authority, beyond the National lines. Com. Paulding published a letter giving an account of the destruction of the Norfolk Navy-Yard, in April, 1861.--(Doc. 148.) Henry Kuhl, Hamilton W. Windon, and Conrad Kuhl, having been tried by court-martial, in Western Virginia, and found guilty of murdering a Union soldier, the two first named were sentenced to be hung, and the third to wear a ball and chain, and perform hard labor during the war. Major-Gen. Fremont, in an order issued this day, confirmed the findings and sentence of the court. The hanging is to take place at Suttonville, on the ninth of May, and the ball and chain individual is ordered to Camp Chase, to satisfy the violated law in that locality.--Cincinnati Gazette, April 29.
o the Democracy of the United States, setting forth party organization as a positive good and essential to the preservation of public liberty.--Cincinnati Gazette, May 9. Four companies of the Seventh Illinois cavalry, under command of Major Aplington, when reconnoitring within a mile and a half of Corinth, Miss., discovered twith a crew and two citizens on board, on a mission to Tannery Point, but they run over to Newport News, and surrendered to General Mansfield!--Baltimore American, May 9. Three brigades of General Buell's army seized the portion of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad between Corinth and the Grand Junction, and thus cut the communication between those points.--Chicago Times, May 9. Governor Clark, of North-Carolina, in response to a demand of the confederate government for more troops and transportation, informed that government that it had received all the aid from North-Carolina that it could expect, and that no more troops would be permitted to l
May 9. This night the rebels evacuated Pensacola, Florida, and set fire to the forts, navy-yard, barracks, and marine hospital. General Arnold, at Fort Pickens, commenced a bombardment when the destruction of property was begun, with the hope of saving a portion of the forts and property. The steamers Bradford and Neaffie were burnt. Fort McRae, the hospital, and navy-yard were destroyed. The barracks were saved, as were also the foundry and black-smith shop in the navy-yard.--(Doc. 13.) This morning, a company of rebel cavalry, one hundred strong, under command of Captain Walker, made a dash on Washington, N. C., with the avowed purpose of capturing all the Federal officers, and suddenly returning before the gunboats could open upon them. But the pickets heard them approaching, and several of them united their squads, and poured a raking fire into them, killing Captain Walker and five men, besides wounding several others. The cavalry immediately retreated without ef
May 9. The Charleston Mercury of this date published an article advocating the following plan suggested by the Jackson Appeal: How to meet the enemy.--The Northern vandals have invaded our State, not to confront our armies and decide the chances of war in pitched battles, but they have come to rob and steal, to plunder, to burn, and to starve to death our women and children. Under such circumstances we should meet them as we would meet the savage, the highwayman, or the wild beast of the forest. Partisan bands should lie in wait for them on the roadside, in fence-corners, and behind trees; and, in short, they should be hunted down in any and every way that can be made efficient and effectual until the State is relieved of their presence. Not observing the rules of civilized warfare themselves, they cannot expect its observance from us. We need more Colonel Blythes in the woods all over the State. A dozen well-directed shots from the bush will at any time put a brigade