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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 389 389 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 26 26 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 24 24 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 19 19 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 19 19 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for May 10th or search for May 10th in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
n his defeat, but would soon make another effort, with renewed vigor, and on a larger scale. I was therefore very much concerned when, scarcely a week afterward, the War Department compelled me to send Cooke's and Clingman's commands back to North Carolina, and, early in May, two other brigades [S. R. Gist's and W. H. T. Walker's], numbering five thousand men, with two batteries of light artillery, to reenforce General Joseph E. Johnston at Jackson, Mississippi. The fact is that, on the 10th of May, Mr. Seddon, the Secretary of War, had even directed that still another force of five thousand men should be withdrawn from my department to be sent to Vicksburg to the assistance of General Pemberton. But my protest against so exhaustive a drain upon my command was fortunately heeded, and I was allowed to retain the reduced force I then had under me, amounting on the 1st of June, for the whole State of South Carolina, to not more than ten thousand men. With these, it was evident, I coul
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
ed, Upton was ordered to retire, but he carried back with him several stand of colors and 1200 prisoners. For gallant conduct displayed during the assaults on the 10th, Colonels Upton and Carroll were made brigadier-generals.--A. S. W. On the left Burnside made an attack in conjunction with those on the right. He pushed close to the enemy, on the Fredericksburg road, and intrenched. General T. G. Stevenson, commanding one of his divisions, was killed in making this assault. On the 10th of May the Second, Fifth, and Sixth corps lost 4100 men killed and wounded. Not many were missing. The Confederates lost probably two thousand men. On the 11th It was at this time that General Grant sent his famous all summer dispatch, in these words: headquarters, armies of the U. S., near Spotsylvania Court House, May 11th, 1864, 8:30 A. M. Major-General Halleck, Chief-of-Staff of the Army. General: We have now ended the sixth day of very heavy fighting. The result to this ti
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Hand-to-hand fighting at Spotsylvania. (search)
loody angle. It was held by General Edward Johnson's division. Here the Confederate line broke off at an angle of ninety degrees, the right parallel, about the length of a small brigade, being occupied by General George H. Steuart's regiments. Steuart occupied only part of the right parallel; Jones, Stafford, and Hays were on his left, and Lane was on his right in that parallel.--editors. This point was a part or continuation of the line of works charged and carried by General Upton on May 10th, and was considered to be the key to Lee's position. Just as the day was breaking, Barlow's and Birney's divisions of Hancock's corps pressed forward upon the unsuspecting foe, and leaping the breast-works after a hand-to-hand conflict with the bewildered enemy, in which guns were used as clubs, possessed themselves of the intrenchments. Over three thousand prisoners were taken, including General Johnson and General Steuart. Twenty Confederate cannon became the permanent trophies of the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
250 killed and wounded; McGowan's brigade (Wilcox's division), 481 killed, wounded, and missing; Lane's brigade (Wilcox's division), 272 killed and wounded, and 143 missing; Kershaw's brigade (under Henagan), 57 killed, 239 wounded, and 26 missing; Bryan's brigade (Kershaw's division), 31 killed and 102 wounded; Mahone's brigade, 20 killed, 126 wounded, and 7 missing; Gordon's brigade, 50 killed, wounded, and missing. The reported casualties at Spotsylvania are as follows: Ewell's corps (May 10th), 650, and (May 19th), 900; Edward Johnson's division (May 12th), over 2000; and McGowan's brigade (May 12th), 86 killed, 248 wounded, and 117 missing. The following summary, aggregating 3507, exhibits the losses of Beauregard's forces on the south side of the James from May 6th to June 2d, so far as reported: command.date. Killed. Wounded.Captured or missing.Total. Ransom's, Hoke's, and Colquitt's divisions.May 163551941 2102506 Barton's brigadeMay10 3617934 249 Hagood's brigadeMa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.27 (search)
erate with General Ransom for the defense of the capital. But, rapid as were the movements of our troops, withdrawn from North Carolina and other points, their celerity failed to satisfy or reassure the War Department, whose trepidation grew hourly more intense, and whose orders, telegrams, and suggestions became as harassing as they were numerous. The incursion of the enemy's cavalry at Jarratt's, and the burning of Stony Creek bridge, prevented me from reaching Petersburg before the 10th of May. Hoke also arrived on that day, and was placed by me at the head of our advancing column, consisting of six brigades of infantry and eight batteries of artillery, and began an immediate march toward Drewry's Bluff, with orders to form there, or thereabout, as early a junction as practicable with Ransom's forces. As other troops were still coming in from Weldon and elsewhere, whose organization and assignment to duty I thought best to supervise personally, I concluded not to follow on
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Butler's attack on Drewry's Bluff. (search)
s own purposes a volunteer navy under the command of General C, K. Graham, an ex-navy officer, who, scorning the slow and steady progress of the admiral's squadron, took the lead, followed by the fastest transports in what seemed to be some grand national pageant. Fortunately no torpedoes or masked batteries checked General Butler's commodore, and by sunset a brigade had been landed at Bermuda Hundred above the mouth of the Appomattox River, and by 9 o'clock of the morning of the 6th of May the Tenth and Eighteenth corps were in position on the line from Walthall's Landing on the Appomattox across to the James, and the work of intrenching called for by General Grant's letter of April 2d was begun, but not in the specified place. The line taken up was about three and a half miles in length. Richmond was on the right and Petersburg on the left. The distance between the two cities was by the turnpike about twenty-one miles. From the center of the lines to the turnpike was about two m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cold Harbor. (search)
t army had cut from the Rapidan to the Chickahominy, had been strewn with the bodies of thousands of brave men, the majority of them wearing the Union blue. No great or substantial success had been achieved at any point. The fighting in the Wilderness had told heavily against us, as it must necessarily against an assaulting army in such a country. A gleam of victory had come when the selected column of the Sixth Corps, under Russell and Upton, carried the works near Spotsylvania on the 10th of May. Upton was promoted the next day by telegraph to be brigadier-general — an honor he had more than once deserved.--M. T. McM. I Failure elsewhere and conflicting orders had led to the abandonment of the works and the guns, and about one thousand prisoners remained as the sole fruits of the success. On the 12th, at the Bloody Angle, Hancock had inspired the army with new hope, taking there also four thousand prisoners by a brilliant dash, but the slaughter that followed in holding the w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
dea of the nature of this tremendous contest to group by Major-General Edward Johnson, C. S. A. From a photograph. days and count its various combats from the beginning of the campaign: On May 5th, three; on May 6th, four; on May 8th, two; on May 10th, five; on May 12th, repeated assaults during twenty hours in salient and two combats on another part of the line; May 18th, one; May 19th, one. It is no wonder that on these fields the Confederate ordnance officers gathered more than 120,000 pocross the peninsula. The overland campaign north of the James was at an end. Except in the temporary driving back of Lee's right on the morning of May 6th before the arrival of Longstreet's divisions, the brief occupation of Rodes's front on May 10th, Hancock's morning assault on May 12th, and a few minor events, tho campaign had been one series of severe and bloody repulses of Federal attacks. The campaign on the Confederate side was an illustration of Lee's genius, skill, and boldness, an
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
, three infantry brigades and two batteries, from General S. I). Lee's command, with 5145 for duty and a detachment of 550 from French's division, reached Resaca May 10th, 11th, and 12th. Meantime a regiment of the Georgia State line, estimated as six hundred strong, had been added to Hood's corps. At Resaca General Johnston hfollowing men available for battle: Present for duty at DaltonApril 30th52,992 Mercer's brigadeMay 2d 2,800 Cantey's divisionMay 7th 5,300 Loring's divisionMay 10th, 11th, and 12th5,145 French's detachmentMay 12th 550 French's divisionMay 19th 4,174 Jackson's cavalryMay 17th 4,477 Jackson's cavalry increase beforeJune 10al except for Mercer's brigade and the two regiments of the Georgia State line. For the strength of Jackson's cavalry division, see General S. D. Lee's return May 10th, and the return of General Johnston's Army June 10th, 1864. For the strength of General French's division, see his return of effectives when joined. For the st
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
l, Capt. John W. White; 57th Ohio, Col. Americus V. Rice, Lieut.-Col. Samuel R. Mott. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. A. J. Lightburn, Col. Wells S. Jones, Brig.-Gen. J. A. J. Lightburn, Col. Wells S. Jones, Brig.-Gen. J. A. J. Lightburn, Col. Wells S. Jones: 83d Ind., Col. Benjamin J. Spooner, Capt. George H. Scott, Capt. Ben. North; 30th Ohio, Joined from veteran furlough May 22d, and transferred to First Brigade August 4th. Col. Theodore Jones; 37th Ohio, Joined from veteran furlough May 10th. Lieut.-Col. Louis von Bessingh, Maj. Charles Hipp, Capt. Carl Moritz; 47th Ohio, Col. Augustus C. Parry, Lieut.-Col. John Wallace, Maj. Thomas T. Taylor; 53d Ohio, Transferred from Third Brigade, Fourth Div., May 12th. Col. Wells S. Jones, Lieut.-Col. Robert A. Fulton, Col. W. S. Jones; 54th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Robert Williams, Jr., Maj. Israel T. Moore. Artillery, Capt. Francis De Gress: A, 1st Ill., Capt. Peter P. Wood, Lieut. George McCagg, Jr., Lieut. Samuel S. Smyth, Lieut. George Ec
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