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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 389 389 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 26 26 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 24 24 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 19 19 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 19 19 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for May 10th or search for May 10th in all documents.

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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
Nineteenth Alabama Infantry, of skirmish near Farmington, May 10. No. 74.-Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, U. S. Army, of acte were engaged in grand-guard duty, when on the evening of May 10 we moved across Seven Mile Creek and encamped at the distaneral Pope's advance about 10 o'clock of Saturday morning, May 10, and at 1 p. m. we received orders to move forward to his from which we retired at midnight the night previous. May 10 we established our camp. May 11, 12, and 13 the regimee remained in line of battle during the day and night. May 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14.-In camp, large daily details being fuo withdraw his battery, which had been in some danger. May 10.-Major Burton, with six companies of the Third Michigan annowledge of their results. In the afternoon of the 10th day of May I was under orders to move my command forward with thenth Alabama Infantry, of skirmish near Fiarmington, Miss., May 10. Hdqrs. Advanced camp, Withers' Division, May 10, 186
made an attack on our flotilla yesterday morning. Two of their gunboats were blown up and one sunk. The remainder returned with all possible haste to the protection of their guns at Pillow. Wm. K. Strong, Brigadier-General. Major-General Hallecbk. No. 2.-report of Capt. J. E. Montgomery, C. S. Navy. flag-boat little rebel, Fort Pillow, Tenn., May 12, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report an engagement with the Federal gunboats at Plum Point Bend, 4 miles above Fort Pillow, May 10: Having previously arranged with my officers the order of attack, our boats left their moorings at 6 a. m., and proceeding up the river passed round a sharp point, which brought us in full view of the enemy's fleet, numbering eight gunboats and twelve mortar boats. The Federal boat Carondelet was lying nearest us, guarding a mortar boat, that was shelling the fort. The General Bragg, Capt. W. H. H. Leonard, dashed at her; the Carondelet, firing her heavy guns, retreated toward a bar