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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 389 389 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 26 26 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 24 24 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 19 19 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 19 19 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 10th or search for May 10th in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Doc. 11.-Senator Douglas's last letter. Chicago, May 10. My dear sir: Being deprived of the use of my arms for the present by a severe attack of rheumatism, I am compelled to avail myself of the services of an amanuensis, in reply to your two letters. It seems that some of my friends are unable to comprehend the difference between arguments used in favor of an equitable compromise, with the hope of averting the horrors of war, and those urged in support of the government and the flag of our country, when war is being waged against the United States, with the avowed purpose pose of producing a permanent disruption of the Union and a total destruction of its government. All hope of compromise with the cotton states was abandoned when they assumed the position that the separation of the Union was complete and final, and that they would never consent to a reconstruction in any contingency--not even if we would furnish them with a blank sheet of paper and permit them to in
the Governor of this Territory, to aid in maintaining the laws and integrity of the national Union, I do hereby call upon all the citizens of this Territory capable of bearing arms, and liable to militia duty, to report immediately to the Adjutant-General of the Territory, and proceed at once to organize themselves into companies, and elect their own officers, in the manner prescribed by the act of January 26, 1855, and the amendatory act of February 4, 1858, to organize the militia. The organization of each company will be immediately reported to Adjutant-General Frank Matthias, at Seattle, W. T., and through him to the Governor, when the commissions will issue to the officers elected. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the Territory to be affixed, at Olympia, this tenth day of May, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and of the Independence the eighty-fifth. [L. S.] Henry M. Mcgill, Acting Governor of Washington Territory
t purpose. There have been no specific disclosures made to the public of the details of this plan, but the Governor expresses his strong conviction that at the proper time the State will go out. This correspondence of the Governor occurred at a time when there was no interference by soldiers of the United States with any of the citizens, or with the peace of the State. The event which produced exasperation through the State, the capture of Camp Jackson, did not take place until the 10th of May. Yet, the evidence is conclusive that there was at the time of this correspondence a secret plan for taking Missouri out of the Union without any assent of the people through their Convention. An address to the people of Missouri was issued by Thomas C. Reynolds, the Lieutenant-Governor, in which he declares that in Arkansas, Tennessee, and Virginia his efforts have been directed unceasingly, to the best of his limited ability, to the promotion of our interests, indissolubly connected
ed wounded! I have lost one hundred and forty-two in killed, wounded, and missing, from my command of six hundred and fifty men. We captured thirteen of the enemy's best cannon, and all of the accompanying carriages and ammunition. Also some four hundred prisoners, and several stand of colors, and a large quantity of good arms. My regiment fought in that part of the field where General Lyon was slain. This is a just reward for the thirty-five men and children butchered by him on the 10th of May in St. Louis. I will furnish you a list of the killed and wounded as soon as possible. Respectfully, T. J. Hughes. --Western Argus, Mo. General Fremont's order. General orders no. 4Headquarters, Western Department, St. Louis, Mo., August 25, 1861. I. The official reports of the commanding officers of the forces engaged in the battle near Springfield, Mo., having been received, the Major-General commanding announces to the troops embraced in his command, with pride
ed wounded! I have lost one hundred and forty-two in killed, wounded, and missing, from my command of six hundred and fifty men. We captured thirteen of the enemy's best cannon, and all of the accompanying carriages and ammunition. Also some four hundred prisoners, and several stand of colors, and a large quantity of good arms. My regiment fought in that part of the field where General Lyon was slain. This is a just reward for the thirty-five men and children butchered by him on the 10th of May in St. Louis. I will furnish you a list of the killed and wounded as soon as possible. Respectfully, T. J. Hughes. --Western Argus, Mo. General Fremont's order. General orders no. 4Headquarters, Western Department, St. Louis, Mo., August 25, 1861. I. The official reports of the commanding officers of the forces engaged in the battle near Springfield, Mo., having been received, the Major-General commanding announces to the troops embraced in his command, with pride