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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 389 389 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 26 26 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 24 24 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 19 19 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 19 19 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for May 10th or search for May 10th in all documents.

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ut not always sure of a reply. The latter, much concerned in his own charge, had been utterly unprepared for Johnston's ultimatum. Two telegrams of Gen. J. E. Johnston from Jackson, Miss., may be cited here. No. 1, to Pemberton at Vicksburg, January 1, 1863: General Gardner is full of confidence. No. 2, to Gardner, January 2, 1863, I am told you are confident with your present force. I hope that is so, for we cannot afford more men than you want Gardner retained this confidence until May 10th, when a letter from General Johnston instructed him that his duty lay in evacuation rather than heroism. The more sudden seemed this order of evacuation by reason of a hope which had, in the last days of June, sprung up from the known presence of Richard Taylor, back on his old fighting ground in lower Lousiana. Taylor, in this campaign, had a variety of reasons. One of these was the gathering of beef cattle for the relief of the starving garrison of the Port. In a campaign, Dick Ta
t 23. Colonel Lewis mentioned in addition to names already given, AssistantSur-geon Bass as greatly distinguished, and Sergeant-Major Bradford, wounded. Capt. Robert L. Keen was now in command of the Twentieth. Scott's brigade reached Resaca May 10th, when Mc-Pherson's corps was four miles distant, intent on cutting off the retreat of Johnston from Dalton. On the 13th, McPherson advancing, Scott was thrown forward to Bald Knob to meet him, where he held the enemy in check three hours, untilhill in the rear. When Sherman was crowding the retreat later, Scott's brigade with a section of the Pointe Couple battery assisted General Wheeler in checking the enemy. On the New Hope line they engaged in heavy skirmishing for a week. From May 10th to June 1st the brigade loss was 341, a due share of which was borne by the Louisianians. Of the Louisiana regiments then with Quarles we snatch a glimpse through the smoke of battle in the report of the gallant Cleburne of the fight of May 2