Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for May 11th or search for May 11th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
in 1865, 4,105. Valuation in 1860, $1,644,433; in 1865, $1,699,105. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Mason White, Seth B. Wing, Isaiah Fish; in 1864, H. G. O. Ellis, Seth B. Wing, Isaiah Fish; in 1865, H. G. O. Ellis, Paul Wing, Isaiah Fish. The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was David C. Freeman; from June, 1863, and during 1864 and 1865, David C. Percival. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 11th of May; It is proper to state that a public meeting was held in April in the Town Hall, notice of which had been given by posters and the ringing of church-bells, an account of which we find in the Sandwich Republican of April, 1861. Several gentlemen made speeches, among whom was Major S. B. Phinny, editor of the Barnstable patriot, a democratic paper. He was frequently interrupted by the spontaneous and hearty applause of the audience whenever any allusion was made to our Flag, the Constit
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
ation in 1860, 998; in 1865, 962. Valuation in 1860, $256,822; in 1865, $311,595. The selectmen in 1861 were Elam P. Norton, Samuel A. Jones, Pardon Perry; in 1862, Samuel A. Jones, Nathaniel J. Kenyon, Pardon Perry; in 1863, Alanson Crittenden, Marcus Phelps, Lorenzo Webb; in 1864, Alanson Crittenden, Isaac J. Norton, Amos D. Cotton; in 1865, Elam P. Norton, Samuel Hamilton, John Hunter. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Joseph L. Waters. 1861. May 11th, The town voted to pay each soldier seven dollars a month while in the service, and State aid to each family; provided the Legislature does not make the pay of the soldiers as good as the foregoing. 1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. August 26th, The selectmen were authorized to
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
present crisis in regard to organizing a militia company in Seekonk. After discussion it was voted to raise one. Tristram Burgess, Esq., gave his check for one hundred dollars in aid of the enterprise; and, on motion of Mr. Burgess, it was voted that, as part of the town may soon be set off to Rhode Island, a committee be appointed to raise money by subscription to arm and support the company, and that a roll be immediately opened for volunteers to sign. The meeting then adjourned until May 11th (in the mean time the company had been raised). It was voted that the company raised have the use of the town hall for drilling, but not to be used on Sunday evenings. On the 22d of May another adjourned meeting was held, but nothing of especial interest or importance was done. On the 5th of November a meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of volunteers in such sums as will be refunded by the State. 1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 22d of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
, George F. Duren, Joel Boynton, Isaac Blaisdell; in 1863, John Q. A. Greene, L. Wilkins, James M. Currier; in 1864, George F. Duren, John Jacobs, Seba D. Bartlett; in 1865, George Duren, Seba D. Bartlett, Joel Boynton. The town-clerk during all these years was George F. Duren. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Thomas Greene; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, William Greene. 1861. The first action taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in matters relating to the war, was on the 11th of May, when it voted to pay each volunteer nine dollars a month in addition to his Government pay, the number not to exceed ten, and the payment to continue for one year. Selar Simons, Benjamin F. Heald, and Artemas Parker were authorized to draw on the town-treasurer for such sums as may be requisite to carry the above vote into effect. 1862. July 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer, to the number of nine, who shall enlist for three years and be credited t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
humway, George M. Smith, Jeremiah R. Smith. The town-clerk during the years 1861, 1862, and 1863 was Samuel Ellis; in 1864 and 1865, Henry J. Everett. The town-treasurer during all these years was Isaac Fiske. 1861. At a town-meeting held May 11th, a committee was appointed to consider and report what action the town should take to sustain the Government. This committee reported that, to aid the Government in the suppression of the Rebellion, one thousand dollars be appropriated to furnasurer under direction of the selectmen was authorized to borrow money, and the bounty to each volunteer was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, who should enlist before the 1st of March, 1865, under any call of the President. 1865. May 11th, Voted, to refund the money contributed by individuals to encourage recruiting during the year 1864. Randolph furnished nine hundred and nineteen men for the war: This number has been verified, but it is at least three hundred more than th
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
Carver had one company in the Third Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, which left the State for Fortress Monroe on the 17th of April for three months service, under the first call of the President for troops. At a meeting held on the 11th of May it was voted that the town make up the pay of all soldiers in said company in addition to what they receive from the Government to twenty-six dollars a month. 1862. July 24th, Voted, to pay each of the fourteen men called for to fill the quny B, Third Regiment Massachusetts Militia, had left the State with the regiment for Fortress Monroe, Va., and as it subsequently appeared had reached its destination, and was disembarking at the very time the meeting was being held. On the 11th of May a legal town-meeting was held, and the following votes passed: First, That the selectmen be requested to distribute not exceeding two thousand dollars towards the assistance of soldiers' families; second, To ratify the proceedings of the citiz
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
, Henry C. Nichols; in 1863, John W. Capron, Nahum Morse, Valentine M. Aldrich, George F. Tucker, Barnabas A. Rawson; in 1864, John W. Capron, George F. Tucker, Jonathan Farnum, Willard Ellison, Caleb T. Richardson; in 1865, John W. Capron, Nicholas B. Williams, Crysis P. Scott, James A. Rawson, Asahel F. Aldrich. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years was Henry Capron. 1861. The first legal town-meeting to consider matters connected with the war was held on the 11th of May, at which it was voted to guarantee to each volunteer belonging to the town twenty-one dollars a month while in actual service, and one dollar a day while drilling previous to enlistment, not to exceed twenty days, eight hours to constitute a day. Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated to purchase uniforms for those who enlist, and one hundred dollars for expenses of raising a company of riflemen. The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of the volunteers, not to