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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 503 503 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 30 30 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 16 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for May 15th or search for May 15th in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 30 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ively, by Generals Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield, upon Johnston's army at Dalton; but finding the enemy's positions at Buzzard Roost, covering Dalton, too strong to be assaulted, General McPherson was sent through Snake [Creek] Gap to turn it, while Generals Thomas and Schofield threatened it in front and on the north. This movement was successful. Johnston, finding his retreat likely to be cut off, fell back to his fortified position at Resaca, where he was attacked on the afternoon of May 15. A heavy battle ensued. During the night the enemy retreated south. Late on the 17th his rear guard was overtaken near Adairsville, and heavy skirmishing followed. The next morning, however, he had again disappeared. He was vigorously pursued and was overtaken at Cassville on the 19th, but, during the ensuing night, retreated across the Etowah. While these operations were going on, General Jefferson C. Davis' division, of Thomas' army, was sent to Rome, capturing it with its forts and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ne to reach Resaca, so that when on the 13th May I reached Resaca the enemy had evacuated Dalton and occupied Resaca in force. I did not hesitate to attack him though strongly intrenched. Sending a division (General Sweeny's) of the Sixteenth Corps with a pontoon train to Lay's Ferry with orders to cross the Oostenaula, there to threaten and if necessary attack the enemy's line at Calhoun, I gradually enveloped the enemy in Resaca, and pressed him so hard that he evacuated in the night of May 15 and retreated by the good roads south. He made a short stand at Adairsville and made extensive preparation at Cassville, but on our approach in strength he retreated south of the Etowah River by the Allatoona Pass. The country along the Etowah is rich in wheat fields and in minerals. Occupying Rome and Kingston I delayed until the 23d of May to fill our wagons and replenish ammunition. I knew the strength of Allatoona Pass, having ridden through it twenty years ago, and knew it would
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
n hurled such storms of shell, shot, and canister upon the rebel lines that they were enabled to maintain their position until General Hooker's command, advancing, aided them in turning back the rebel column, which was advancing far in rear of our left flank. I make special mention of the officers and men of this battery for their gallantry and bravery on this occasion. The enemy's loss was reported by prisoners to be near 300 killed, with some 600 or 800 wounded. My loss was light. May the 15th my brigade was massed in column of regiments to support a portion of General Hooker's corps that assaulted and carried a part of the enemy's works in front of Resaca. At night we lay in the trenches which my pioneers had been engaged in constructing under heavy fire. Early next morning, the 16th, the enemy's works were found to be evacuated. We slowly pursued them, and, passing through Resaca, crossed the Oostenaula late in the evening. The One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colon
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
oint, and met the advancing enemy, engaged, and drove him back with severe punishment. My front line was engaged at long range with the enemy while the fight with Hooker was going on. Night soon threw her mantle over the bloody scene, and all was quiet except continued skirmishing. In this day's battle some of our bravest and best officers and men were among the fallen. My assistant inspector-general, Captain Davis, of the Seventy-seventh fPennsylvania, brave and good soldier, fell here. May 15, Major-General Hooker's corps advanced on my left, swinging around to assist, and a severe engagement ensued, in which we gained signal advantages, capturing prisoners and artillery and the enemy had to retreat during the night, leaving most of his dead and wounded in our possession. May 16, we pursued the retreating enemy across the Oostenaula at Resaca, and advanced to near Calhoun and camped for the night. May 17, advanced, encountering the enemy's rear with heavy skirmishing to near Ad
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
irtieth Indiana, moved on to a ridge which commanded Mill Creek Gap, and threw up rifle-pits. On Friday, May 13, at 5 a. m. the regiment with the division moved forward through Dalton, and at 9 a. m. came up with the enemy's rear guard; had some skirmishing, and went into camp. On Saturday, May 14, left camp and marched two miles, when our corps engaged the enemy, skirmishers were thrown out from each regiment; 1 commissioned officer and 1 enlisted man was wounded of this regiment. On Sunday, May 15, skirmishing commenced at daylight, and we were engaged with the enemy more or less all day; lost 3 enlisted men wounded. On Monday, May 16, we moved at 6 a. m. into Resaca, and at 4 p.m. crossed the river and marched four miles, where we encamped for the night. On Tuesday, May 17, we marched at 8 a. m., and encamped within two miles of Adairsville. On Wednesday, May 18, the regiment marched at 6 a. m., passed through Adairsville, and six miles beyond encamped for the night. On Thurs
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
afternoon, to relieve General Harker. Our loss was considerable in Harker's and Sherman's brigades. Among the wounded were General Harker and Colonel Opdycke, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, both of whom refused to quit the field and remained on duty till they recovered. The enemy's artillery fire being annoying during the night, eleven guns belonging to my division were put into position on the bald hills to the right of the woods, forming the right of my line. Sunday, May 15, General Schofield's command having been withdrawn during the previous afternoon and night, I found in the morning my right connecting with the Fourteenth Corps. My artillery opened and soon silenced that of the enemy, from which we experienced no further annoyance. Wagner's brigade was moved in to relieve Sherman's. At 11.30 p. m. a heavy fire of musketry was opened all along our lines (it is uncertain whether the rebels or ourselves commenced it) and continued for some time. May 16,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
on, halting at 5 p. m. to make coffee, camping at 11 p. m. by the roadside. May 14, moved at 4 a. m., advancing very slowly about two miles. The engagement commenced at noon. This regiment was sent into the action at 4 p. m., and at 7 p. m., their ammunition being exhausted, were sent to rear a short distance to replenish their cartridge-boxes. At 11 p. m. the regiment again moved out to the front, and during the night lay upon their arms in works from which the enemy had been dislodged. May 15, the-action recommenced at daylight, the regiment being engaged till 11 a. m. In this interval the cartridge-boxes of the men were twice refilled. Reported to Colonel Bradley, commanding Third Brigade, under whose orders moved a short distance to rear and stacked arms. In this battle (Resaca) the regiment lost 4 men killed and 22 wounded. May 16, it was ascertained at an early hour this morning that the rebel army had entirely disappeared trom our front. Moved out at 8 a. m., passing thro
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 43 (search)
have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the regiment which I have the honor to command in the campaign which has resulted in the capture from the enemy and occupation of Atlanta: On the 3d day of May, 1864, the regiment marched from Cleveland, Tenn., its effective strength being 18 officers and 261 men. Subsequently it assisted in the occupation of Rocky Face Ridge after the capture of that place by the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. May 14 and 15, it was engaged with the enemy at Resaca. May 17, skirmished from Calhoun, Ga., to Pleasant Hill; engaged at Pleasant Hill from 4 p. m. to 6 p. m. May 25, took position at New Hope Church, on left of Twentieth Army Corps; engaged constantly in skirmishing for eleven days. June 6 and 7, covered removal of hospital, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps. 18th, supported skirmish line at Mud Creek. 19th, skirmished on Noonday Creek, in front of Kenesaw Mountain, taking 12 prisoners. 27th, formed par
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
again we were exposed to a murderous artillery fire and musketry. We came close to the enemy's works, drove the same away, and held our position until our men were entirely out of ammunition, when we fell back to the above-mentioned creek. Ammunition having arrived, we opened a brisk fire again, held our position, and stayed there until 9 p. m., when, by order of Colonel Sherman, we were relieved and went into bivouac. My regiment was that day for six hours under constant fire. On the 15th of May at 8 a. m. my regiment relieved the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin and were under fire for two hours. Were relieved at 10 a. m. by the Twenty-second Illinois Volunteers; took position in the second line of our brigade. Continued our march on the 16th of May. On the 17th Company F was detailed as flankers to cover our left, Companies B and G to cover our right flank; Companies A and C to support the Eighty-eighth, which was deployed as skirmishers and had relieved the Thirty-sixth Illinois; the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
. Moore, one hundred and twentyfifth Ohio Infantry, of operations Mlay 14-September 8. headquarters 125TH Ohio Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteers from the 14th day of May, when I took command (Colonel Opdycke having been severely wounded), to the 8th day of September, 1864, when it went into camp near Atlanta, Ga., at the close of the summer's campaign: May 15, the regiment having been heavily engaged yesterday, retired to a commanding position in rear of the front line, and threw up strong earth-works. May 16, the enemy evacuated during the night. The One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at daylight, passed through Resaca at 9.30 a. m.. pressed the enemy closely, and bivouacked at dark near Calhoun. May 17, recommenced pursuit at 7.30 a. m., and moved forward rapidly till 5 p. m., when a brisk skirmish ensued with the enemy's rea
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