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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 533 533 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 8 8 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for May 16th or search for May 16th in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.27 (search)
e, and to strike the enemy's flank and rear. The substance of the above, thus orally given to the three division commanders then with me at Drewry's Bluff, was also contained in a written circular delivered to each of them,--as it had been previously outlined to General Whiting,--so that none could be taken by surprise, no matter what movements might be executed the next day on the different parts of the field. General Ransom began his advance at a quarter to 5 o'clock A. M. [of the 16th of May], but was much retarded by a dense fog of several hours' duration. He had with him Gracie's brigade, Kemper's under Colonel Terry, Barton's under Colonel Fry, and Hoke's old brigade commanded by Colonel Lewis. At 6 o'clock A. M. he had carried the enemy's breastworks in his front, taking, it was claimed,--but this was afterward seriously contested,--several stand of colors and some five hundred prisoners. His troops had behaved with acknowledged gallantry, Gracie's and Kemper's comman
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
y of the Ohio, 13,559 men; the Army of the Cumberland, 60,773, and the Army of the Tennessee, 24,465,--grand total, 98,797 men and 254 guns. I had no purpose to attack Johnston's position at Dalton in front, but marched from Chattanooga to feign at his front and to make a lodgment in Resaca, eighteen miles to his rear, on his line of communication and supply. The movement was partly, not wholly, successful; but it compelled Johnston to let go Dalton and fight us at Resaca, where, May 13th-16th, our loss was 2747 and his 2800. I fought offensively and he defensively, aided by earth parapets. He then fell back to Calhoun, Adairsville, and Cassville, where he halted for the battle of the campaign; but, for reasons given in his memoirs, he continued his retreat behind the next spur of mountains to Allatoona. Pausing for a few days to repair the railroad without attempting Allatoona, of which I had personal knowledge acquired in 1844, I resolved to push on toward Atlanta by way of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
as six hundred strong, had been added to Hood's corps. At Resaca General Johnston had at least 67,000 men for battle and 1.68 pieces of artillery. General Sherman had at most 104,000: For the strength of Sherman's army at Resaca, add 5200 for cavalry joined between May 1st and 12th to his strength, May 1st, of 98,797.--E. C. D. the odds against General Johnston when the armies were actually in contact were as 100 to 64, instead of 10 to 4, as stated in his article. On the night of May 16th the Confederate army evacuated Resaca. On the following day, at Adairsville, it was reinforced by General W. H. Jackson's cavalry command, 4477 for duty, which was increased to 5120 by June 10th. On the 19th of May, at Cassville, the division of General French joined the army with 4174 effectives, exclusive of the detachment that was at Resaca. Another Georgia State line regiment, estimated as 600, was added to Hood's corps, and Quarles's brigade, 2200 strong, came on the 26th of May at
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
Bailey was made a brigadier-general and received the thanks of Congress. The cribs were soon washed away, but it is said the main tree dam survives to this day, having driven the channel toward the south shore and washed away a large slice of the bank at the upper end of the town.--R. B. I. This accomplished and the reunited fleet being on its way to the Mississippi, the army at once marched out of Alexandria on Simsport, where the column arrived, without serious molestation, on the 16th of May. Bailey improvised a bridge of steamboats across the Atchafalaya, General Banks speaks of this use of steamboats to form a bridge as the first attempt of the kind; but when we moved on Port Hudson, the year before, the last of the troops and trains crossed over at the same place in substantially the same way.--R. B. I. here between six and seven hundred yards wide, and thus, by the 19th, the whole command crossed in safety. On the day before, however, the rear-guard under Mower had r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations in east Tennessee and south-west Virginia. (search)
ated across the mountains into Kentucky. The raiders were prevented from occupying Bristol and doing further damage by the timely arrival of General Marshall's force, which pursued to Jonesville. In May, 1862, a much larger invading force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, numbering several thousand, was led up the Kanawha and New rivers, West Virginia, by General J. D. Cox. This column was met at Princeton, in Mercer County, and arrested by General Marshall in an engagement on the 16th of May, which resulted in the repulse and retreat of the invading force, whose killed and wounded were left behind. [See Vol. II., p. 280.] On the 3d of September, 1863, Burnside occupied Knoxville, Tennessee, with his army corps. General J. M. Shaekelford commanded Burnside's cavalry force in the Knoxville campaign.--editors. Nearly all the available Confederate forces had been ordered to reenforce Bragg at Chattanooga. A small force under Brigadier-General Alfred E. Jackson occupied
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 11.81 (search)
y's Bluff at that date, and had arrived late in the evening and been placed in position on our new line, a fact which had given a feeling of unequivocal relief to all who had seen or taken part in the unequal contest of that memorable day. But Hoke's division, composed then of Colquitt's, Hagood's, and Clingman's brigades, with the addition later on of Martin's, had never belonged to the Army of North Virginia, though sent temporarily to reinforce it after the battle of Drewry's Bluff, on the 16th and 17th of May. They formed part of my new command, as did also Bushrod i. Johnson's division, including Matthew W. Ransom's brigade, transferred north of the James River on or about the 4th of June.--G. T. B. By the 16th of June three Federal corps,--Smith's, Hancock's, and Burnside's,--aggregating about 66,000 Later compilation makes the total more probably 53,000.--editors. men, confronted our lines. Opposed to them I had, after the arrival of Johnson's division, about 10 A. M.,