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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 533 533 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 8 8 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 16th or search for May 16th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
hat he could capture Richmond before General Grant arrived. General Butler's dispatch caused great satisfaction in Washington, which was soon dispelled by an unforeseen occurrence. In the month of April General Beauregard had been ordered to proceed from Charleston to strengthen the defences of Richmond. He passed through Wilmington with a large body of troops, receiving constant accessions on the march, and assumed command of the district on the south and east of Richmond. On the 16th of May Beauregard attacked Butler's advanced position in front of Drury's Bluff, and Butler was forced back into his intrenchments between the James and the Appomattox Rivers; thereupon Beauregard intrenched himself strongly in his front, covering the city of Richmond from any further attempts of Butler in that direction. This predicament of Butler gave rise to the celebrated letter of General Grant, in which he speaks of Butler's being as completely hors du combat as if he were enclosed in a b