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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 533 533 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 8 8 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for May 16th or search for May 16th in all documents.

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o intense and formidable was the resistance that the Senate at length May 6, 1862. referred the bill to a Select Committee of seven--Mr. Clark, of N. H., chairman — who duly reported therefrom A bill to suppress Insurrection, and punish Treason and Rebellion ; which merely authorized the President, at his discretion, to proclaim free all slaves of persons who shall be found in arms against the United States thirty days after the issue of such proclamation. On this bill being taken up, May 16. Mr. Davis, of Ky., tried to have it so amended that the said slaves, instead of being freed, should be sold and the proceeds put into the Treasury; but only seven Senators were found sufficiently Democratic to sustain that proposition. lie next proposed that no slave should be emancipated Under this act, until he should be on his way to be colonized at some point outside of the United States: which proposition received but six votes. Here the Senate bill was dropped, in deference to the a
cted Mc-Pherson to retrace his steps next morning May 15. to Clinton, following himself in tie afternoon; impelling McClernand's corps westward next morning May 16. upon Edwards's Station; while Sherman, having finished his work at Jackson, was ordered to evacuate that city and rejoin him so soon as might be; for Grant had llroad. It was, therefore, Grant's business and purpose to prevent this conjunction by meeting and beating Penmberton before it could be effected. At 5 A. M., May 16. Grant learned that Pemberton's force consisted of 80 regiments, with 10 batteries of artillery, probably numbering in all about 25,000 men, A Rebel report say, and took up a strong position on Champion Hills, southward of the railroad, and about midway between Jackson and Vicksburg. Here lie received, next morning, May 16. a note from Johnston, directing him to move northward, so as to form a junction with his own shattered forces. most of which had so recently been driven out of
meantime been nominated for Governor by an overwhelming vote in a large Democratic State Convention, and with an understanding that, in case of his anticipated election, he should be escorted from the State line to its capital by a volunteer procession of Democrats strong enough to resist successfully any attempt to rearrest him. The action in this case of Gen. Burnside and his Court Martial created a profound sensation throughout the country; and a great meeting of Democrats was held May 16. at Albany, wherein very strong resolves condemning such action were unanimously passed — among them the following: Resolved, That we denounce the recent assumption of a military commander to seize and try a citizen of Ohio, Clement L. Vallandigham, for no other reason than words addressed to a public meeting, in criticism of the course of the Administration and in condemnation of the military orders of that General. Resolved, That this assumption of power by a military tribunal, it s
most determined efforts by our men, a high wind and the proximity of inflammable substances insured the destruction of a considerable portion of the buildings. Gen. Banks bad apprehended such a disaster, and had directed Gen. Grover, post commandant, to take precautions against it; but they proved unavailing. It is of course probable that some evil-disposed person or persons purposely started tire fire. On the march to Simmsport, a Rebel cavalry force was encountered just at daybreak May 16. at Mansura, near Marksville, by our advance, and pushed steadily back across the open prairie to the woods beyond ; where a stand was made for three hours--the fighting being mainly by skirmishers and artillery — until our main body had come up, and Gen. Emory on our right and Gen. A. J. Smith on our left had flanked the foe's position, when, after a sharp but brief struggle, lie was driven, with considerable loss — we recapturing a part of the prisoners taken with our vessels on the river
tersburg. But now, deceived by fresh, joyful, but hardly truthful, Washington advices, Butler turned his face northward, to participate in the expected speedy capture of Richmond; pushing his lines gradually up to Proctor's creek, whence the enemy withdrew May 13. to an intrenched line behind it, which Gen. Gillmore flanked, and which was to have been assaulted; but our troops had been so dispersed that the requisite force was not at hand; so the attack was deferred till next morning. May 16. But Beauregard — whom Butler supposed still at or below Petersburg, unable to get up — was on hand, with a formidable force, and intent on making himself disagreeable. A dense fog shrouded every thing, when, before daylight, our sleeping soldiers on the front were startled by a grand crash of artillery and musketry. Our forces had been so disposed that there was over a mile of open country between our right and the James, merely picketed by 150 cavalry; and Beauregard, having made car
built, British-armed, and (mainly) British manned cruisers engaged in the spoliation of our commerce; whereof the powerful iron-clad Stonewall, after having been for some time watched by the Niagara and the Sacramento in the Spanish port of Ferrol. finally ran across to Havana, where she arrived after the fall of the Confederacy, and was taken in charge by the Spanish authorities, who promptly handed her over, May 28, 1865, to Rear-Admiral Godon, who, with a formidable fleet, had been sent, May 16, to cruise among the West Indies in quest of her. Admiral Godon brought her into Hampton Roads June 12, and turned her over to the Navy Department. There still remained afloat the swift steamer Shenandoah, Capt. Waddell, built at Glasgow in 1863, and which, as the Sea King, put to sea from London, Oct. 8, 1864, in spite of the protests of our functionaries; having cleared for Bombay: but which was met at a barren islet off Madeira, Oct. 17, by the British steamer Laurel, from Liverpool, w