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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
litary emblems. 1864. February 20th. A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Company G, Twenty-sixth Regiment. Two thousand dollars were appropriated to pay expenses attending enlistment services. April 4th, The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. June 8th, A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Companies A and B of the Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. 1865. May 17th, It was voted as follows:— Whereas the President of the United States has by proclamation recommended the observance of the first day of June as a day of mourning, in consequence of the death of our late beloved and honored Chief Magistrate, Abraham Lincoln; therefore— Ordered, That we do take measures for an appropriate observance of the day as recommended by the President, and that a committee be appointed to procure an orator for the occasion, and make necessary arrangements; and
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
1860, 1,292; in 1865, 1,212. Valuation in 1860, $624,769; in 1865, $687,610. The selectmen in 1861 were John Wright, A. S. Peabody, Dudley Bradstreet; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, A. S. Peabody, Samuel Todd, Dudley Bradstreet; in 1865, Jacob Foster, J. W. Batchelder, David Clark. The town-clerk during all these years was J. P. Towne. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Benjamin Kimball; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Nehemiah Balch; in 1865, Jeremiah Balch. 1861. A legal town-meeting was held May 17th, at which the following preamble and resolutions were adopted:— Considering the present position of our country, not as waging war against the South, nor a party device, but an essay of the people to sustain their own rights, preserve their own institutions, give efficiency to their own laws, invigorate their execution, and perpetuate the inheritance of our fathers unimpaired,— Resolved, That we, the loyal people of Topsfield, in town-meeting assembled, constitute ourselves a Nationa