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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 567 567 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 24 24 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 13 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 13 13 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 18th or search for May 18th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
York April 27 July 30 Sept. 10   St. Lawrence Philadelphia April 20 Late in May. June 29   Santee Portsmouth, N. H April 17 May 27 June 20 Sloops--           Savannah New York April 1 June 1 July 10   Jamestown Philadelphia April 9 May 18 June 8   Vincennes Boston April 9 June 24 July 12   Marion Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 14   Dale Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 17   Preble Boston April 20 June 22 July 11 Brigs--           Bainbridge Boston April 20 May       Roanoke New York April 20 June 20 June 25   Colorado Boston April 20 June 3 June 18   Minnesota Boston April 3 May 2 May 8   Wabash New York April 9 April 29 May 30   Pensacola Washington         Mississippi Boston April 6 May 18 May 23   Water Witch Philadelphia Feb. 14 April 10 April 17 When the vessels then building and purchased of every class, were armed, equipped, and ready for service, the condition of the Navy would be as follows:
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
purpose by Lieutenant Davidson, who had been watching the movements of the Federals since the transports first assembled in Hampton Roads. The investigations of the naval officers soon disclosed a system of defence embracing all the navigable rivers. The torpedoes were followed up, their positions located, and, wherever practicable, they were destroyed, making the waterways comparatively safe, and enabling General Butler to reoccupy his line from Trent's Beach to Appomattox. On the 18th of May the enemy commenced fortifying the heights about Howlett's House, commanding Trent's Reach, on the James; and although the gun-boats kept up a steady fire on their position, they persevered, and that night mounted a sufficient number of guns to keep the Federal gun-boats in check. The charts indicating less water in the channel than the Monitors drew, it was not considered advisable to move them too close to the batteries. The enemy seemed to be prepared all along the river to meet th