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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 635 635 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 28 28 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 17 17 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 17 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 15 15 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 8 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for May 19th or search for May 19th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
hatever may be my fate beyond this life, I should always seek, love, and rejoice in the good. Thus, even in hell, one might share by sympathy the heavenly victory. May 5. I begin in great infirmity of spirit a week which brings many tasks. First, I must proceed in the matter of Norman's injury to my estate, either to a suit or a settlement by arbitration unless I can previously come to an understanding with N. A heavy affliction was soon to drive all other thoughts from her mind. On May 19, a telegram arrived from Italy saying, Samuel Ward expired peacefully. She writes: Nothing could be more unexpected than this blow. Dear Broa Sam had long since been pronounced out of danger.... Latterly we have heard of him as feeble, and have felt renewed anxiety, but were entirely unprepared for his death. May 20. Dark days of nothingness these, to-day and yesterday. Nothing to do but be patient and explore the past. May 21. Had a sitting all alone with dear Uncle Sam's picture
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
pore. In the evening read my paper on the Moral Initiative as regards Women. The hall [of Washington] was frightfully cold. May 17. Going to the Art Palace this afternoon I found an audience waiting in one of the small halls with no speaker. Madame C. had engaged to speak on musical education. I was requested to fill the breach, which I did, telling of the Boston Conservatory of Music, early music in Boston, and down to our time. Had an ovation afterwards of friendly handshaking. May 19. Meeting of National Alliance of Unitarian Women. May 27. My seventy-fourth birthday. Thank God for my continued life, health, and bodily and mental powers. My prayer to Him is that, whether I am to have a year, a month, a week, or a day more, it may be for good to myself and others. Went to the Columbian Exhibition. Thomas's Orchestra playing for Mrs. Potter Palmer's reception given to the women of the Press Association. Later I went into the model kitchen where tea was served by
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
its chance with the rest, to be laid down at the call of the hour and taken up again when the insistence of screed or poem was removed: this while in Boston or Newport. During the Roman winter, soon to be described, she wrote steadily day by day; but here she must still work at disadvantage, having no access to journals or papers, depending on memory alone. May 7. Question: Cannot we follow up the Parliament of Religions by a Pan-Christian Association? I will try to write about this. May 19. Had sought much for light, or a leading thought about what I ought to do for Armenia.... Wrote fully to Senator Hoar, asking his opinion about my going abroad and whether I could have any official support. May 28. Moral Education Association, 10 A. M., Tremont Temple. I wish to record this thought which came to me on my birthday: As for individuals, no bettering of fortunes compares in importance with the bettering of character; so among nations, no extension of territory or aggregati
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
; was bitterly sad at disappointing the suffragists and Deland. Dr. Wesselhoeft was asked on this occasion why, at her age, so severe an attack as this had not resulted in paralysis. Because, he replied, she brought to receive it the strength of forty years of age! Sure enough, the next day she felt as if her nervous balance was very well restored, and in a week she was at work again. May 18.... In the evening had word of a Decoration Day poem needed. At once tried some lines. May 19. Doubted much of my poem, but wrote it, spending most of the working hours over it; wrote and rewrote, corrected again and again. Julia Richards mailed it at about 4 P. M.... Just as I went to bed I remembered that in the third verse of my poem I had used the words tasks and erect as if they rhymed. This troubled me a good deal. My prayer was, God help the fool. May 20. My trouble of mind about the deficient verse woke me at 6.30 A. M. I tossed about and wondered how I could lie still