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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 350 350 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 17 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 20.. You can also browse the collection for May 20th or search for May 20th in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 20., Notes Epistolary and Horticultural. (search)
ease of her husband, and as her father and mother were then dead and her two sisters had remained single women, she purchased the old family mansion, added to it and beautified it in every way, and made it a home for herself and sisters. She was the Lady Bountiful of the town, and enjoyed an old age of the highest respectability and comfort until the occurrence of the terrible catastrophe which destroyed her life. She was, however, the only victim of the conflagration in the year 1819, Sunday, May 20. The other members of the family barely escaped in their nightdresses. All the first generation are now in their graves but many descendants remain, who are, I believe without exception, distinguished for their goodness and intelligence. I never heard the history of the apple trees before, but I make no doubt of its truth. Mrs. Wells was quoted for many years by the matrons here as a model of thrift and economy. She was greatly shocked at what she regarded as the wastefulness of our