hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 462 462 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 15 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 14 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 12 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for May 21st or search for May 21st in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

ree companies, at first an independent battalion, were afterwards consolidated with the 41st Mass. Infantry and became the 3d Mass. Cavalry (Colonel Chickering). Of these, the 2d Mass. Battery was detained at sea and did not actually arrive until May 21. The expectation was that this land force might be employed to take the forts that commanded the river, should the navy fail to reduce them. As a matter of fact the navy accomplished it; but Major Whittemore of the 30th Mass. occupied Fort Ster brought to justice, though the act was disavowed and condemned by the Confederate officers. Another brother, Maj. Wilder Dwight, had already fallen at Antietam. In the siege of Port Hudson, Colonel Chickering (41st Mass. Infantry) marched, May 21, from Barreas Landing with a force consisting of his own regiment,—now mounted as cavalry on prairie horses,—the 52d Mass. Infantry, four Maine and New York regiments and a section of the 2d Mass. Battery under Lieutenant Snow. His column was to