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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 6: Jackson's Valley campaign (search)
l, Banks had escaped with but trifling loss of men or material. The campaign, however, had not been undertaken to capture men or material. Its great object was to break up McDowell's proposed march from Fredericksburg to reenforce McClellan in front of Richmond. This, it will be seen, was fully accomplished by the help of the following chapter of accidents and just at the critical moment. McDowell had been ordered to march as soon as he was joined by Shields's division. It arrived on May 22. Only one day was needed to equip it for the march to Richmond, but the loss of three days followed. Its artillery ammunition had been condemned by an inspector and a second day was lost, waiting for ammunition which had been delayed by the grounding of a schooner near Alexandria. Everything, however, was ready by the night of the 24th, and McDowell was anxious to march on Sunday, the 25th. But a third day's delay now ensued from Mr. Lincoln's superstitious feeling that his chances of su
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
ted and pursued, but the pursuers soon encountered a division with its artillery and were repulsed with severe loss. It had made a resolute attack, as stated by Humphreys, and lost Willis and two of his colonels, killed. Meanwhile, Butler having been defeated, and, as said by Grant, bottled at Bermuda Hundreds, Grant decided to draw from him two divisions of the 10th and one of the 18th corps, under command of W. F. Smith, with which to give Lee a surprise. The orders had been given on May 22, the troops to be brought by water down the James and up the York. On May 30, the transports bearing them began to arrive at the White House, and to disembark about 16,000 infantry, whose coming was not known to Lee. But he, having the reenforcements which joined him at Hanover Junction, about 9000, and receiving now Hoke's division, which had come over from Drury's Bluff, about 6000, and being disappointed at Grant's failure to attack his lines on the Totopotomoy, had himself planned a gra