Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for May 23rd or search for May 23rd in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Augusta, (search)
ory leader, to hold Augusta. Over this garrison Pickens and Clarke had kept watch, and when, on May 20, 1781, they were joined by Lee and his legion, they proceeded to invest the fort there. They took Fort Galphin, 12 miles below, on the 21st, and then an officer was sent to demand the surrender of Augusta. Lieutenant-Colonel Brown was one of the most cruel of the Tories in that region, and the partisans were anxious to make him a prisoner. He refused to surrender. A regular siege began May 23, and continued until June 4, when a general assault was agreed upon. Hearing of this, Brown proposed to surrender, and the town was given up the next day. In this siege the Americans lost fifty-one men killed and wounded; and the British lost fifty-two killed, and 334, including the wounded, were made prisoners. For several years after the war it was the capital of Georgia. It was garrisoned by Confederate troops during the Civil War, and was twice threatened by Sherman in his marches fro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
f by solitary flight General Taylor's attack on Monterey. across the Rio Grande. The garrison at Fort Brown was relieved. In the mean while, Congress had declared, May 11, 1846, that, by the act of the republic of Mexico, a state of war exists between that government and the United States, and authorized the President to raise 50,000 volunteers. They also (May 13) appropriated $10,000,000 for carrying on the war. The Secretary of War and General Scott planned a magnificent campaign. On May 23 the Mexican government also declared war. General Taylor crossed the Rio Grande, drove the Mexican troops from Matamoras, took possession of the town (May 18), and remained there until August, when he received reinforcements and orders from his government. Then, with more than 6,000 troops, he moved on Monterey, defended by General Ampudia, with more than 9,000 troops. It was a very strongly built town, at the foot of the great Sierra Madre. A siege commenced Sept. 21 and ended with t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
failed. The transport Escort, bearing one of Spinola's regiments, accompained by General Palmer and others, ran the gantlet of batteries and sharp-shooters and carried supplies and troops to the beleaguered garrison. At the middle of April, Hill, expecting an expedition against him, abandoned the siege and fled. In May an expedition, led by Col. J. R. Jones, attacked the Confederates 8 miles from Kinston, capturing their intrenchments, with 165 prisoners. They were afterwards attacked (May 23) by the Confederates, but repulsed their assailants. Colonel Jones was killed. Near the end of the month Gen. E. A. Potter led a cavalry expedition, which destroyed Discussing the terms of the surrender of Johnston's army. much property at Tarboro and other places. The country was aroused by this raid, and Potter was compelled to fight very frequently with Confederates sent against him. Yet his loss during his entire raid did not exceed twenty-five men. Soon afterwards (July) Foster's d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Richmond, campaign against (search)
Richmond, campaign against The first collisions between the two great armies on the borders of the Chickahominy River occurred on May 23 and 24, 1862—one near New Bridge, not far from Cold Harbor, between Michigan cavalry and a Louisiana regiment, when thirty-seven of the latter were captured. The other was at and near Mechanicsville, 7 or 8 miles from Richmond, where a part of McClellan's right wing was advancing towards the Chickahominy. There was a sharp skirmish at Ellison's Mill (May 23), a mile from Mechanicsville. To this place the Confederates fell back, and the next morning were driven across the Richmond during the Civil War. Chickahominy. On the same morning General McClellan issued a stirring order for an immediate advance on Richmond; but the overcautious commander hesitated to move until the golden opportunity had passed. President Lincoln telegraphed to the general, I think the time is near when you must either attack Richmond or give up the job and come to t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schley, Winfield Scott 1839- (search)
ted its proceedings and the testimony taken, with a full and detailed statement of all the pertinent facts, which it deems to be established, together with its opinion and recommendation in the premises. The text of the opinion and the recommendation are as follows: Opinion of Court Commodore Schley, in command of the Flying Squadron, should have proceeded with utmost despatch off Cienfuegos and should have maintained a close blockade of that port. He should have endeavored on May 23, at Cienfuegos, to obtain information regarding the Spanish squadron by communicating with the insurgents at the place designated in the memorandum delivered to him at 8.15 A. M. of that date. He should have proceeded from Cienfuegos to Santiago de Cuba with all despatch, and should have disposed his vessels with a view of intercepting the enemy in any attempt to pass the Flying Squadron. He should not have delayed the squadron for the Eagle. He should not have made the retrograde t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
ll-pox there caused the delegates to adjourn to Charleston, where they proceeded at once to business. They chose several committees, one of which was to draft an ordinance of secession. J. A. Inglis was chairman of that committee, and on Dec. 20 reported the David F. Jamison. following ordinance: We, the people of the State of South Carolina, in convention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained, that the ordinance adopted by us in convention on the 23d day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight, whereby the Constitution of the United States was ratified, and also all acts and parts of acts of the General Assembly of the State ratifying amendments of the said Constitution, are hereby repealed, and the union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States under the name of the United States of America is hereby dissolved. This ordinance had been framed by Robert B. Rhett some time before, and the committ
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Southern Confederacy. (search)
Southern Confederacy. The legislature of South Carolina passed the following ordinance, Dec. 20, 1860: We, the people of the State of South Carolina, in convention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained, that the ordinance adopted by us in convention on the 23d day of May, in the year of our Lord 1788, whereby the Constitution of the United States was ratified, and also all acts and parts of the General Assembly of this State ratifying amendments of the said Constitution, are hereby repealed; and that the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved. This was the first action on the part of a State legislature which led to the Montgomery convention. The delegates from six States—South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida met at Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 4, 1861. Jefferson Davis was inaugurated as President, Feb. 18, 1861, and t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tariff. (search)
July 19, and passes the House by vote of 149 to 14......July 21, 1888 [Referred in the Senate to the finance committee, by whom a substitute was prepared, and failed to become a law.] A bill to equalize duties upon imports and to reduce the revenue of the government, introduced by William McKinley, Jr., of Ohio......April 16, 1890 McKinley Customs Administration act approved......June 10, 1890 McKinley tariff bill passes the House, May 21; referred to Senate committee on finance, May 23; reported to the Senate with amendments, June 18; passes Senate with amendments, Sept. 10; reported by conference committee to House, Sept. 26; approved by the President, Oct. 1, and takes effect Oct. 6, 1890 Tariff (Wilson) bill made public......Nov. 27, 1893 Internal revenue bill containing the income-tax reported to the House......Jan. 24, 1894 Tariff bill with income-tax attached passes the House, 204 to 140......Feb. 1, 1894 Senate passes tariff bill, 39 yeas (thirty-seven
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trials. (search)
6 R. J. M. Ward ( the most extraordinary murderer named in the calendar of crime ), Cleveland, O.......1857 Emma A. Cunningham, for the murder of Dr. Burdell, in New York City, Jan. 30, 1856; acquitted......May, 1857 Daniel E. Sickles, for killing Philip Barton Key, Washington, D. C.; acquitted......April 4-26, 1859 John Brown, for insurrection in Virginia; tried Oct. 29, and executed at Charlestown, Va.......Dec. 2, 1859 Albert W. Hicks, pirate; tried at Bedloe's Island, May 18-23; convicted of triple murder on the oyster-sloop Edwin A. Johnson in New York Harbor; hanged......July 13, 1860 Officers and crew of the privateer Sa-vannah, on the charge of piracy; jury disagree......Oct. 23-31, 1861 Nathaniel Gordon, for engaging in the slave-trade, Nov. 6-8, 1861; hanged at New York......Feb. 21, 1862 Fitz-John Porter tried by military court......1863 C. L. Vallandigham, for treasonable utterances; by court-martial in Cincinnati; sentence of imprisonment during
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
nt of stones bearing the arms of France, and builds Fort Charles......1562 Rene de Laudonniere, with three vessels sent from France by Coligni, settles at point now known as St. John's Bluff......June 22, 1564 Sir John Hawkins, with four vessels, anchored at Laudonniere's settlement, and, seeing the settlers in great need, offers to take them back to France. Laudonniere refuses, but buys a vessel of Hawkins, who sets sail......Aug. 15, 1565 Seven vessels under Ribault, from Dieppe, May 23, with 500 men and families of artisans, land at river St. John......Aug. 29, 1565 Don Pedro Menendez de Avilla arrives from Spain with an expedition at St. Augustine, Aug. 28, 1565. Re-embarking, they discover four large vessels of the French anchored at the mouth of the St. John. Being fired upon by the Spanish, the French put to sea, and Menendez returns to St. Augustine, lands, and takes possession of the country in the name of the King of Spain......Sept. 8, 1565 Menendez, with 5
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