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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 820 820 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 24 24 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 21 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 25th or search for May 25th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ote urgent letters in the middle of May to the Navy Department, requesting that ironclads be sent him. It was the most uncomfortable position that any officer was placed in during the war, when told by the Department as late as June, 1864, that the vessels could not be furnished because the contractors had not come up to their contract. But the Admiral bore it all bravely, and with his usual equanimity prepared his wooden ships to do the best they could in the coming conflict. Not until May 25th does Farragut speak of the Tennessee having arrived in the Mobile Roads, and anchored under the guns of Fort Morgan. He went in as close as he could, examined her with good glasses, and satisfied himself that all that had been said about her formidable character was true. He had been deceived so many times by what were supposed to be iron-clads, that he was glad to have his mind settled on this question, and to know that this was really the Tennessee without her consorts. On June 2d, r
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
ver and had done considerable damage. She followed in the footsteps of all the Confederate rams, and was the last one that we know of that was at that time owned by the Confederacy. The following officers of the Webb gave themselves up, after having been pursued to the swamps by the Navy: Lieutenant Read, her late commanding officer; Lieutenant Wm. H. Wall, Master S. P. LeBlanc, Passed-Midshipman H. H. Scott, Assistant Surgeon W. J. Addison, and Pilot James West. It was not until the 25th of May that the Confederates began to evacuate their fortified places in Texas and return to their homes. The first place evacuated was the works at Sabine Pass, which had been a point both parties had contended for throughout the war. About May 27th, the Confederate Army in Texas generally disbanded, taking advantage of the terms of surrender entered into and executed at New Orleans between the Confederate Commissioners and General Canby, of the U. S. Army, where all the Confederate fortifi