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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 820 820 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 24 24 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 21 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 25th or search for May 25th in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 7 document sections:

ed upon application, for organized companies ; no company will be esteemed organized until a descriptive list is filed with the Military Board, showing the requisite number of men; certificates of election for company officers should accompany the descriptive list. Any commissioned officers of the State may hold and certify to company elections. Able-bodied men, sixteen years and upwards, may be received into service. If the requisite number of men is not made up by volunteering by the 25th of May, the deficiency will be detailed or drafted from the militia brigades or regiments having the fewest men in service. Troops raised under this call will not be transferred to confederate service under any circumstances without their consent, and on no account, unless a confederate force, sufficient to prevent invasion, is sent into the State. These are raised exclusively for home protection. Horses, horse equipments and arms lost by the casualties of war, will be paid for by the State.
men generally of my command, especially to officers and men of battery M, whose skill and courage tended so much by their destructive fire to disconcert the enemy, and hold him in check. In fine, in the two days of the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth of May, the larger portion of my brigade marched sixty-one miles, the Second Massachusetts skirmishing on the twenty-fourth, for more than six hours, with rebel cavalry and artillery, the whole command on the twenty-fifth fighting a battle. I and Second-Lieut. Crowninshield. Major Dwight and Assistant-Surgeon Stone are missing. Very respectfully, your obt. serv't, Geo. L. Andrews, Lieut-Colonel Second Massachusetts Regiment Commanding. A National account. Hagerstown, Md., May 25. After the inglorious idleness to which we seemed destined by the withdrawal of so large a portion of this division to join other and more important corps d'armee, a rapid succession of events has transpired, to chronicle which is an unwelcome
s press on to see the cause. The last rebel had crossed the Shenandoah — their almost interminable train could be seen winding along like a huge snake, in the distant valley. Several regiments were drawn in line of battle on the opposite side of the river. An unfordable river was between them, and the only bridge was in flames. The battle of P Cross Keys was now a matter of history, and the famous pursuit of Jackson and his army was at an end. Gen. Fremont had left Franklin on Sunday, May twenty-fifth, taking up his line of march for the valley of Virginia. At Petersburgh he had left his tents and heavy baggage. With one exception, he had marched sixteen consecutive days. The rains had been heavy and severe. Frequently our soldiers had bivouacked in water and mud, and lain down in their drenched clothes to steal a little sleep, to have a dream of the loved ones at home, and to have a very few hours of rest that they might endure the fatigues of the coming day. Transportation
Doc. 53.-Fremont's pursuit of Jackson. New-York Tribune account. Fremont's headquarters, Mount Jackson, Va., June 3, 1862. Gen. Fremont left Franklin on Sunday, May twenty-fifth. His troops were exhausted by previous forced marches to relieve Schenck and Milroy, from which they had not had time to recruit, and were weak from want of food. The first seven miles of road were only just not absolutely impassable by wagons. It was just such a road as cannot be found in the East, nor where an army has not passed. Wounded and sick were left at Franklin, because an attempt to carry them would have killed them. Nevertheless, with all its train of wagons, the army marched fifteen miles the first day. The next it reached Petersburgh, thirty miles from Franklin, at noon, and halted till Tuesday morning. Orders were then issued that knapsacks, tents, and baggage of every description that could possibly be dispensed with should be left behind. The knapsacks were stored in houses
in charge. Coles's and Battery Islands shelled by the enemy. May 21.--Six of our pickets, of Capt. Jones's company, Twenty-fourth regiment South Carolina volunteers, made prisoners on Battery Island. Expecting, apparently, the enemy to pass by, without discovering them, they, instead of withdrawing, hid themselves in the magazine on the approach of a gunboat up the Stono. Enemy saw them and landed. Legare's, on James Island, shelled this day by a gunboat slowly going up the Stono. May 25.--Gunboats to this time had been running up the Stono for several miles every day, shelling both sides of the river, and returning in the evening to Battery Island. Effort to-day of Brig.-Gen. Ripley to draw them within effective reach of guns of Fort Pemberton, failed. Gallantry of Capt. Frank Bonneau, and the men of our little floating battery, stationed for the day in the creek near Dixon's Island, remarked. A gunboat which engaged the battery, was driven off in a few minutes. The bat
rcy, Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac, New-Bridge: General: I have the honor to report the operations of the Third and Fourth army corps, under my command during the engagements of the thirty-first of May and first of June. On the twenty-fifth of May, Gen. Keyes's corps was placed under my command. He was directed to advance to the Seven Pines, on the Williamsburgh stage-road, about seven miles from the city of Richmond. My corps was ordered to cross the Chickahominy at Bottom's Brid action of to-day. The Ninety-third Pennsylvania regiment, Col. McCarter, was on the ground during the fight, acting as a portion of the reserve. Doc. 116.-defeat of General Banks. Excitement in Baltimore, Maryland. Baltimore, Md., May 25. the excitement and exasperation of feeling that has been smouldering in this city ever since the memorable scenes of April, 1861, culminated yesterday in acts of violence and serious breaches of the peace. The news of the defeat of the First
Doc. 116.-defeat of General Banks. Excitement in Baltimore, Maryland. Baltimore, Md., May 25. the excitement and exasperation of feeling that has been smouldering in this city ever since the memorable scenes of April, 1861, culminated yesterday in acts of violence and serious breaches of the peace. The news of the defeat of the First Maryland regiment and of the death of Col. Kenly caused a high feeling of exasperation, and this was increased by the open rejoicing of the disloyal among us over these events. During the whole of yesterday large crowds were congregated in Baltimore street and other localities, and parties who were known to be disloyal or who expressed treasonable sentiments, were attacked and in some instances very severely beaten. With one or two exceptions no deadly weapons were used, and the injuries given and received are not of a dangerous nature. The police apparently used their utmost endeavors in protecting those who were attacked, and in most ca