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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 820 820 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 24 24 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 21 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 25th or search for May 25th in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

ptured a train of thirty wagons and a piece of artillery from Jackson, and had he not been very good on the run, would have caught his entire command. Our loss in the battle at Cloyd Net was at least five hundred, and the enemy must have lost at least a third more, in addition to prisoners. We captured six pieces of artillery on the trip, three of which we brought away with us. Very respectfully, R. Another account. headquarter's General Crook's command, Meadow Bluff, West Va., May 25. This division of the army having returned from its recent expedition and encamped at this place, I was enabled to join it last evening, and to learn, through the kindness of General Crook and the officers of his command, all the particulars of their recent journey into Dixie, and of the success they met there. First, as to the present condition of the army. It is encamped--one brigade being in Lewisburg, on Meadow Bluffs, fifteen miles north-west of the former place, while the men an
robably attempt to cross it. General Thomas at once clad one of his spies in rebel uniform, instructed our pickets to fire at him (over his head, of course), and sent him through the lines with a despatch to Joe Johnston that he (Taylor) had done so with a loss to us of two thousand or so, and many prisoners. It was a cruel joke upon the rebel, and procured for the spy, besides, access to valuable information from pretty high rebel sources. The army then marched quietly on towards Dallas. May 25. The day passed off without incident or note, till about five o'clock in the afternoon, when the sound of a brisk cannonade in the advance discovered a fight in progress. It proved to be General Hooker's corps, which had held the advance on the march, engaged with the rebel General Hood's corps. Early in the forenoon, while the General and his staff were inspecting the bridge over Pumpkin Vine Creek, about half way between Burnt Hickory and Dallas, he was fired upon by a cavalry picket,
ing the bridges behind him. Our loss not heavy. We rested in camp at Cassville until May twenty-third, when we marched, crossed the Etowah river to the right of the Atlanta road, and camped at Euharley. May 24.--Marched to Burnt Hickory. May 25.--Advanced toward Dallas, crossed Pumpkin-vine creek, rested in reserve in rear of Major-General Hooker's corps, while he had heavy fighting in front, late in the evening. May 26.--Moved into position on left of Twentieth corps, pressed close nd captured a courier with a letter of General Johnston, showing that he had detected the move, and was preparing to meet us about Dallas. The country was very rugged, mountainous, and densely wooded, with few and obscure roads. On the twenty-fifth of May, General Thomas was moving from Burnt Hickory for Dallas, his troops on three roads, General Hooker having the advance. When he approached the Pumpkin-vine creek, on the main Dallas road, he found a respectable force of the enemy's cavalr
ur lines, be in a position to cut him off from Richmond. This corps is already within a few miles of his direct line toward Hanover Junction. We can cut off his supplies from that point at pleasure, and compel him to fight us on ground of our own selection. It is just possible, however, that he may have taken the alarm yesterday and already given us the slip, by a timely retreat with the main body of his army. headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25--12 M. After three weeks of marching and fighting, here, then, is the Army of the Potomac, sixty miles from its starting point north of the Rapidan, safely planted south of the North Anna river, and within twenty-five miles of the objective point which, for three years, has been the goal of all the bloody struggles of this army. The hasty despatches which alone it has been possible to send amid the turmoil of action have acquainted you with the more salient facts at least in our la
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25-- (search)
headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25--12 M. After three weeks of marching and fighting, here, then, is the Army of the Potomac, sixty miles from its starting point north of the Rapidan, safely planted south of the North Anna river, and within twenty-five miles of the objective point which, for three years, has been the goal of all the bloody struggles of this army. The hasty despatches which alone it has been possible to send amid the turmoil of action have acquainted you with the more salient facts at least in our later movements, and I shall confine these notes to the record of the operations of the past two or three days. They comprise the strategic operations employed in turning the fortified lines of Spottsylvania and the tactical operations of yesterday and to-day, in crossing the North Anna river, and the actions succeeding the passage. Taken together, they form, perhaps, the most substantial successes of the campaign, a