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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 888 888 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 30 30 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for May 26th or search for May 26th in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 30 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
in pursuit, and succeeded in capturing him on the morning of May 11. On the 4th day of May General Dick Taylor surrendered to General Canby all the remaining rebel forces east of the Mississippi. Subordinate reports of Wilson's expedition will appear in Vol. XLIX. A force sufficient to insure an easy triumph over the enemy under Kirby Smith, west of the Mississippi, was immediately put in motion for Texas, and Major-General Sheridan designated for its immediate command ; but on the 26th day of May, and before they reached their destination, General Kirby Smith surrendered his entire command to Major-General Canby. This surrender did not take place, however, until after the capture of the rebel President and Vice-President, and the bad faith was exhibited of first disbanding most of his army, and permitting an indiscriminate plunder of public property. Owing to the report that many of those lately in arms against the Government had taken refuge upon the soil of Mexico, carryi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
Affair at Madison Station, Ala. May 18, 1864.Skirmish at Pine Log Creek. May 18-19, 1864.Combats near Kingston. Combats near Cassville. May 20, 1864.Skirmish'at Etowah River, near Cartersville. May 23, 1864.Action at Stilesborough. May 24, 1864.Skirmishes at Cass Station and Cassville. Skirmish at Burnt Hickory (or Huntsville). Skirmish near Dallas. May 25-June 5, 1864.Operations on the line of Pumpkin Vine Creek, with combats at New Hope Church, Pickett's Mills, and other points. May 26-June 1, 1864.Combats at and about Dallas. May 27, 1864.Skirmish at Pond Springs, Ala. May 29, 1864.Action at Moulton, Ala. June 9, 1864.Skirmishes near Big Shanty and near Stilesborough. June 10, 1864.Skirmish at Calhoun. June 10-July 3, 1864.Operations about Marietta, with combats at Pine Hill, Lost Mountain, Brush Mountain, Gilgal Church, Noonday Creek, McAfee's Cross-Roads, Kenesaw Mountain, Powder Springs, Cheney's Farm, Kolb's Farm, Olley's Creek, Nickajack Creek, Noyes' Creek, and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
e long and fatiguing operations which succeeded General Hooker's assault. I do not doubt the truth of the allegation, but the facts are, first, that my head of column only had arrived at General Hooker's first position when his attacking movement commenced; second, that I was directed to hold myself in readiness to move forward if ordered; third, that I did so move forward as promptly as possible the moment I received word I was needed, but arrived too late to partake in the engagement. May 26, General Newton's line was relocated so as toform a better connection with General Hooker. General Stanley filled a gap on Newton's right with two or three regiments, the rest of his division in reserve. General Wood gradually developed his line on Newton's left, driving in the enemy's skirmishers, crossing Brown's Mill creek with his main force, and securing an important hill, then apparently opposite the enemy's right flank. These lines were found subsequently at different points to be w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
24th we passed Euharlee Creek and went into camp late at night in heavy rain at Burnt Hickory. On the 25th we continued in pursuit of the enemy, and passing Pumpkin Vine Creek were ordered to support General Hooker's corps, which had come up with and had a severe engagement with the rebels. These re-enforcements did not arrive any too soon, though night had intervened between the enemy and General Hooker's disordered troops. We went into line of battle at night and lay in this position. May 26, remained in this position. May 27, moved across Little Pumpkin Vine Creek near Brown's saw-mill, relieving the Second Brigade, of General Wood's division. At this point we remained until the 5th of June, working day and night, in rain and mud, under heavy fire. Severe skirmishing took place night and day with but little intermission, varied every day by heavy artillery firing. This position was most fiercely contested, yet day and night my officers and men for ten days worked and fou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
e night the enemy again retreated, crossing the Etowah River, seven miles distant, burning the bridges behind him. Our loss not heavy. We rested in camp at Cassville until May 23, when we marched across the Etowah River, to the right of the Atlanta road, and camped at Euharlee. May 24, marched to Burnt Hickory. May 25, advanced toward Dallas; crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek, rested in reserve in rear of Major-General Hooker's corps, while he had heavy fighting in front late in the evening. May 26, moved into position on left of Twentieth Corps, pressed close upon the enemy's lines, and fortified four miles north of Dallas. May 27, changed position to left, relieving General Wood's division. Close skirmishing all day. May 28, advanced, drove in the enemy's outposts, and fortified. May 29, advanced the battery to front line; heavy skirmishing; during the night the enemy attacked and was repulsed with heavy loss. We continued the varied scenes, some changes in position, with hea
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
d there during the day. May 21 and 22, still in camp near Cassville, Ga. May 23, left camp near Cassville at 1,30 p. m.; we reached Cartersville at 10 p. m. and encamped for the night. Moved on the morning of the 24th at 6 a. m., and marched nearly all day in a southerly direction, crossing the Etowah River about 4 p. in.; marched about eight miles and encamped for the night. May 25, left camp at 6 o'clock and marched about five miles in a southerly direction, reaching camp about 10 p. m. May 26, left camp at 9.30 a. m., and marched in a southeasterly direction. We hastened to re-enforce General Hooker. The enemy having made a stand near Dallas, Cobb County, Ga., formed in line of battle about 7 p. n., and encamped for the night. May 27, the skirmishing commenced early this morning, and my regiment threw up a line of works; afterward were moved to the left, and took position on the front line, where we built another line of works. Casualties, 1 man killed and 1 wounded. Remained
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
day, and Sunday, 20th, 21st, and 22d, the regiment lay in camp. On Monday, May 23, we marched west six miles, where we crossed the Etowah River, and continuing the march four miles farther encamped for the night. On Tuesday, May 24, the regiment moved out of camp at 6 a. m., and marched fifteen miles and encamped. On Wednesday, May 25, the regiment left camp at 10 a. m. and marched about eight miles to where the Twentieth Army Corps had been fighting, and encamped for the night. On Thursday, May 26, the regiment moved into the line of battle, our brigade being in reserve. On Friday, May 27, the regiment moved forward to the front line, and had sharp fighting all day. The casualties were 1 enlisted man killed and 3 wounded. On Saturday, May 28, our skirmishers were hotly engaged. The casualties in the regiment were I commissioned officer and 8 enlisted men wounded. On Sunday, May 29, the skirmishing continued all day; casualties, 4 enlisted men wounded. On Monday, May 30, the s
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
d to Burnt Hickory, second in order of march. May 25, took the road toward New Hope Church, crossing the bridge over Pumpkin Vine Creek, in rear of Williams' division, Twentieth Corps, my division leading the Fourth Corps. Advanced to the neighborhood of New Hope Church, but did not participate in the conflict, though Kimball's (First) brigade was formed on the left of the road in readiness for such an event. About night-fall the whole division was formed in line on the left of the road. May 26, reformed my lines and intrenched within eightyfive paces of the enemy's works; placed Goodspeed's battery (A, First Ohio) on the right of my line, relieving one of General Stanley's batteries posted there. From this date until the evacuation of the enemy on the night of June 4 there was continual skirmishing and demonstrations on my line. We lost many men in these operations by sharpshooters, and from the fact that our camps were exposed to the enemy's fire. It was a period of unpreceden
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 39 (search)
we lost I officer and 12 men; were relieved by the Eighty-eighth Illinois. At 5 p. m. of the same day, in accordance with orders from the brigade commander, the regiment was put into action and behaved with coolness and courage. The regiment again suffered severely in loss of officers and men. On the morning of the 18th of May the Thirty-sixth Illinois, in accordance with orders, started in line of march in the column for Kingston. Moved toward Dallas May 23; arrived near New Hope Church May 26. At this place we were under fire for eleven days, during which time the regiment was engaged in skirmishing, erecting works, and performing other duties incident to a position so close to the enemy. The patient endurance and determined bravery of both officers and men during this time are worthy of highest praise. June 7, we marched to a point near Acworth, from which place, on the 10th, the regiment moved toward Kenesaw. On the 19th of June Colonel Miller was ordered by the brigade com
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
lonel Sherman in command of the brigade May 22. The regiment remained at this point at rest until 12 noon of the 23d instant, when it marched in a southwesterly direction, crossing the Etowah River at 10 p. m., camping at midnight four miles beyond the river. May 24, marched at 6 a. m., moving slowly and with frequent halts, camping at 8 p. m. May 25, marched at 9 a. m., halting at 4 p. m.; lay in line of battle all this night (25-26). Continuous rain all night. This near New Hope Church. May 26, slightly changed position this morning, and at 10 a. m. established a line and built works under the fire of the enemy's sharpshooters. Constant skirmishing all day. This night lay on arms. Loss, 1 enlisted man wounded. May 27, this morning moved a short distance to the right and lay in works until 4 p. m., when the regiment moved out to advance line of works, and engaged the enemy until darkness set in. Loss, I enlisted man killed and 2 wounded. Moved to right, battalion distance, and l
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