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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 888 888 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 30 30 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 26th or search for May 26th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
y was displayed. On the 6th of May, Lieutenant-Commander Braine reports a boat expedition from the steamer Monticello and the mortar schooner Matthew Vassar (Acting-Master L. A. Brown), mentioning the destruction of one of the vessels in Morrell's Inlet, an English schooner called the Golden Liner, of Halifax, with a large cargo, and also the burning of two large store-houses. Destruction of this kind of property always caused serious loss to the enemy, and it could not be replaced. On May 26th, Rear-Admiral Lee reports the operations in the sounds of North Carolina. It appears that the Confederates had invested Washington, on the Pamlico River, which investment lasted eighteen days, and after a fruitless effort to take the place (which would have been of no use to them if they had succeeded), the enemy retired on the 15th of April. Washington, N. C., had been pretty extensively fortified by the Confederates while they held it, but they had been driven away from it by the Fede