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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 945 945 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 29 29 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 24 24 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 13 13 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 12 12 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for May 28th or search for May 28th in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 21 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
irector. No. 14Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-July 26. No. 15Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations August 4-September 8. No. 16Col. Isaac M. Kirby, One hundred and first Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 17Capt. William H. Jamison, Twenty-first Illinois Infantry, of operations June 3-September 8. No. 18Lieut. Col. William T. Chapman, Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, of operations May 28-September 8. No. 19Brig. Gen. Walter C. Whitaker, U. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade, of operations May 3-June 30. No. 20Col. Jacob E. Taylor, Fortieth Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of operations June 30-September 8. No. 21Maj. George Hicks, Ninety-sixth Illinois Infantry, of operations June 21-September 8. No. 22Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Tassin, Thirty-fifth Indiana Infantry, of operations July I-September 8. No. 23Brig. Gen. William Grose, U. S. Army, commanding Third Br
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
my suffered immensely in the action, and regarded it as the severest attack made during this eventful campaign. Johnson and Wood made strong intrenchments during the night. General Johnson received quite a severe wound from a shell and was obliged to leave his command the next morning.. During this movement and fighting on the left, Stanley and Newton made strong demonstrations in their respective fronts. At 4 p. m. the enemy tried their lines, from which he was driven back with loss. May 28, very little occurred on my front of interest except the readjusting lines. Stanley placed a brigade in reserve on the Acworth road opposite the interval between General Wood and Major-General Schofield. At 4.30 p. m. the enemy made a slight demonstration in front of Generals Stanley and Newton, while he was making a regular assault upon General McPherson's lines near Dallas. The enemy was repulsed at every point. May 29, very little of interest occurred during the day. An assault was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
No. 18. report of Lieut. Col. William T. Chapman, Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, of operations May 28-September 8. Hdqrs. Thirty-Eighth Illinois Vet. Vol. Infty., Near Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Thirty-eighth Regiment Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry in the campaign: The regiment left Chattanooga May 28, on its return to the field from veteran furlough, and reported at Rossville, by order oMay 28, on its return to the field from veteran furlough, and reported at Rossville, by order of General Steedman, to take charge of and escort a drove of cattle to IResaca. Arrived at Resaca June 2, 1864. There the drove, numbering over 1,200 head, was transferred to Captain Thornton, commissary of subsistence. He called upon me for guard to the front, showing authority from General Sherman for his demand. Addition had been made to the drove, making over 1,700 head, thereby entailing very heavy guard upon the regiment, which numbered only 180 effective men. Arrived at Acworth, Ga., J
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
ht of the Atlanta road, and camped at Euharlee. May 24, marched to Burnt Hickory. May 25, advanced toward Dallas; crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek, rested in reserve in rear of Major-General Hooker's corps, while he had heavy fighting in front late in the evening. May 26, moved into position on left of Twentieth Corps, pressed close upon the enemy's lines, and fortified four miles north of Dallas. May 27, changed position to left, relieving General Wood's division. Close skirmishing all day. May 28, advanced, drove in the enemy's outposts, and fortified. May 29, advanced the battery to front line; heavy skirmishing; during the night the enemy attacked and was repulsed with heavy loss. We continued the varied scenes, some changes in position, with heavy skirmishing, until the night of June 4, when the enemy withdrew from our front, June 6, marched with the corps east ten miles to within two and a half miles of Acworth, on the railroad, where we remained with comparative quietn
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ched in a southeasterly direction. We hastened to re-enforce General Hooker. The enemy having made a stand near Dallas, Cobb County, Ga., formed in line of battle about 7 p. n., and encamped for the night. May 27, the skirmishing commenced early this morning, and my regiment threw up a line of works; afterward were moved to the left, and took position on the front line, where we built another line of works. Casualties, 1 man killed and 1 wounded. Remained on front line during the night. May 28, still on the front line. . May 29, hold the same position during the day and night, as yesterday; I man wounded. May 30, still occupy the same works; nothing but the usual skirmish firing; 1 man wounded. May 31, still in the same works; very heavy skirmishing, but no general engagement. June 1, moved before daylight this morning one mile to the left, and relieved a part of General Whitaker's brigade. June 2, held the same position during day and night. June 3, still in same works. Jun
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
ved out of camp at 6 a. m., and marched fifteen miles and encamped. On Wednesday, May 25, the regiment left camp at 10 a. m. and marched about eight miles to where the Twentieth Army Corps had been fighting, and encamped for the night. On Thursday, May 26, the regiment moved into the line of battle, our brigade being in reserve. On Friday, May 27, the regiment moved forward to the front line, and had sharp fighting all day. The casualties were 1 enlisted man killed and 3 wounded. On Saturday, May 28, our skirmishers were hotly engaged. The casualties in the regiment were I commissioned officer and 8 enlisted men wounded. On Sunday, May 29, the skirmishing continued all day; casualties, 4 enlisted men wounded. On Monday, May 30, the skirmishing still continued; casualties, 2 enlisted men wounded. On Tuesday, May 31, our skirmishers were still engaged, and the casualties of this regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 1, the position of the regiment was still unchan
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
morning, and at 10 a. m. established a line and built works under the fire of the enemy's sharpshooters. Constant skirmishing all day. This night lay on arms. Loss, 1 enlisted man wounded. May 27, this morning moved a short distance to the right and lay in works until 4 p. m., when the regiment moved out to advance line of works, and engaged the enemy until darkness set in. Loss, I enlisted man killed and 2 wounded. Moved to right, battalion distance, and lay on arms all following night. May 28, lay in front line all day, heavily skirmishing with the enemy, whose works were 300 yards in front. Moved back to third line of works at 8 p. m., and lay for the night. Loss during the day, 2 enlisted men killed, 5 enlisted men wounded. May 29, at 8 p. m. regiment moved out and went on picket, occupying hastily constructed rifle-pits immediately in front our works, and distant about 150 yards from enemy's main line of works. At 9 p. m. the enemy opened on us with heavy musketry firing.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
miles under a scorching sun. May 25, moved to within one and a half miles of Dallas, and bivouacked in such position as to support the Twentieth Army Corps, which had engaged the enemy in strong force, and suffered a repulse during the afternoon. May 26, Companies B, F, G, H, and K were placed on picket, and the remainder of the regiment stood to arms during the day and threw up breastworks at night. May 27, the regiment remained behind works until 7 p. m., when it was ordered on picket. May 28, on picket; a continual firing with the enemy was kept up. during the day. May 29, 30, and 31, regiment lay in the trenches. From the 1st to the 4th of June, inclusive, the regiment was constantly under fire of the enemy, occupying nearly the same position in the trenches. June 5, the One hundred and twenty-fifth having been on picket during the night advanced as skirmishers at daybreak and found that the enemy had evacuated his works. June 6, moved at 6 a. m. eight miles toward the railr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
y and dash that nearly made the effort a complete success. After the troops had all been drawn off, and between 10 o'clock in the evening and 2 o'clock of the following morning the entire division was comfortably encamped, and by daylight securely intrenched. This precaution was the more necessary to protect the division against a sudden attack of overwhelming numbers, as it was in some measure isolated from the greater part of the army. The division remained in this position from the 28th of May to the 6th of June, varying it slightly by changes in the lines. Constant skirmishing was kept up the whole time. On the 31st of May the rebel division of General Loring made a decided movement against the front of my division, but it was readily repulsed by the intrenched skirmish line. From prisoners captured it was learned that the rebel division had suffered severely in this demonstration. Saturday night, the 4th of June, the enemy abandoned his position in the vicinity of N
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
ounded, retired a short distance to the rear. Our casualties were large, and attest the terrible character of the assault. Killed, 16; wounded, 71; missing, 67; among them 4 commissioned officers, Capt. L. F. Dimick, Company F; Capt. S. C. Comstock, Company I; Lieutenant Arenschield, Company F, and Lieutenant Wood, Company B. (For names, rank, and wounds, see schedule, marked A.) After retiring to the rear about 600 yards, built breast-works, worked all night at them, and remained in them May 28 and 29, the enemy occasionally feeling our lines and eliciting spirited replies, which sent them speedily back to their works. May 30, advanced the line 500 yards to front and right; built breast-works and remained in them May 31, June 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. During the night of the 5th the enemy abandoned his works on our front. June 6, took up line of march in pursuit via Acworth. June 7, 8, 9, remained in camp waiting orders. June 10, marched forward three miles. June 11, took position in lin
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