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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 148 148 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 18 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 18 18 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 29th or search for May 29th in all documents.

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fforts of the brave regiments from Butterfield and McQuade, who drove from the ground a force superior to the whole of ours engaged at any one time. Butterfield's efforts, from first to last, were productive of the very best results. The results are more than we expected. Up to this hour, over six hundred prisoners. Gen. Stoneman captured a railway-train. Another account. Butterpield's brigade, Porter's division, Fifth provisional army corps, camp near Hanover Court-House, Va., May 29. Fort Donelson, Pittsburgh Landing, Williamsburgh, Hanover, and Fair Oaks illustrate in this war, what is a remarkable fact in the campaigns of both classic and modern times, that the most drenching storms and the deepest mud have not been able to deter energetic commanders and vigorous troops from making long marches or fighting hard battles. The old division of Gen. Fitz-John Porter, now commanded by its ranking general, Brig.-Gen. Morell, received, on the night of the twenty-sixth i
s this, if it be not worthy of commendation, should not call forth censure, for censure undeserved chills the ardor and daring of the soldier, and dishonors both the living and the dead. Very respectfully, etc., Naglee, Brigadier-General. To Lieut. Foster, A. A.A. Gen., Casey's Division, Army of the Potomac. General Peck's report. Peck's headquarters, intrenched camp, near seven Pines, Va. Capt. F. A. Walker, Assist. Adjutant-General: On moving to the Seven Pines on the twenty-ninth of May, I was ordered to occupy and guard the left flank of the encampment with my command, this being regarded as the weaker part of the line. The greater part of the day was occupied in making extensive reconnoissances in the direction of White Oak swamp and the Charles City road. A strong picket line was established, from a mile to a mile and a half in advance. Enemy's pickets were found at many points. On the thirtieth, in consequence of an attack upon Gen. Casey's pickets, my brig
ept up for three hours, and not receiving a reply, I withdrew my forces. The officers and men under my command behaved nobly, and I compliment them for their steadiness under a galling fire, and for the alacrity displayed in obeying every command. The above is respectfully submitted. H. A. Hambright, Colonel Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Acting Brigadier-General Commanding. M. H. Locher, A. A.A. G. A National account. Nashville, Tenn., June 13, 1862. On Thursday, May twenty-ninth, Gen. Negley, who has been in command of the Seventh brigade--formerly in Gen. McCook's division, but now having a separate command — started from Columbia, Tenn., for the purpose of making an expedition into East-Tennessee, with the intention of threatening Chattanooga and capturing or dispersing any of the rebel forces of cavalry hovering around that portion of the country. It was authoritatively reported that the rebels had made a preconcerted movement for the purpose of recapt
t, C. W. Flusser, Lieut. Commanding U. S. Naval Forces in Albemarle Sound. To his Honor the Mayor of Elizabeth City. Doc. 99.-the rebel conscription law. Jeff Davis's letter to Gov. Brown of Georgia. Executive Department, Richmond, May 29. dear sir: I received your letter of the eighth inst., in due course, but the importance of the subject embraced in it required careful consideration; and this, together with other pressing duties, has caused delay in my reply. The constitun. Ransome, of North-Carolina, slightly. Col. Alfred Cummings, in command of Wilcox's brigade, slightly. Doc. 123.-skirmish at Pocataligo, S. C. A National account. Beaufort, S. C., June 1, 1862. On Thursday morning last, May twenty-ninth, a skirmish occurred at Pocataligo, a point near the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, between Salcahatchie and Coosahatchie, in which our forces, under command of Col. B. C. Christ, of the Fiftieth Pennsylvania volunteers, routed about eigh
Doc. 99.-the rebel conscription law. Jeff Davis's letter to Gov. Brown of Georgia. Executive Department, Richmond, May 29. dear sir: I received your letter of the eighth inst., in due course, but the importance of the subject embraced in it required careful consideration; and this, together with other pressing duties, has caused delay in my reply. The constitutional question discussed by you in relation to the conscription law, had been fully weighed before I recommended to Congress the passage of such a law; it was fully debated in both Houses, and your letter has not only been submitted to my Cabinet, but a written opinion has been required of the Attorney-General. The constitutionality of the law was sustained by very large majorities in both Houses. This decision of Congress meets the concurrence not only of my own judgment, but of every member of this Cabinet; and a copy of the opinion of the Attorney-General, herewith inclosed, develops the reasons on which his
Doc. 123.-skirmish at Pocataligo, S. C. A National account. Beaufort, S. C., June 1, 1862. On Thursday morning last, May twenty-ninth, a skirmish occurred at Pocataligo, a point near the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, between Salcahatchie and Coosahatchie, in which our forces, under command of Col. B. C. Christ, of the Fiftieth Pennsylvania volunteers, routed about eight hundred of the rebels. The engagement was conducted entirely with infantry on our side, and was prolonged for about two hours before the enemy were finally dislodged. The details of the affair, which was, in military parlance, a reconnoissance, are as follows: On the evening of the twenty-eighth ultimo the Fiftieth Pennsylvania regiment, together with one company of the Eighth Michigan volunteers, Capt. Doyle, and one company of the Seventy-ninth Highlanders, left Beaufort, arriving at Port Royal Ferry, and crossing over to the main land at day-light. Thence the line of march for Pocatallgo, via