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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 539 539 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 59 59 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 34 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 13 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for May 30th or search for May 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
points reduces the space comprised between them to four or five kilometres; at the elevation of Bottom's Bridge, the swamps give place to a stream which, inclining to the left, carries their muddy waters into the Chickahominy, a few kilometres below. The Williamsburg road and the West Point railway, after crossing the Chickahominy at Bottom's Bridge and at Dispatch, follow a parallel course in a direct line to Richmond. The bridge at Dispatch could not be thoroughly repaired before the 30th of May; all the troops posted on the right bank of the Chickahominy obtained their supplies, therefore, by the turnpike; and to facilitate the distribution of rations most of these troops were encamped in the successive clearings through which this road passes. On the left, dense woods, traversed only by narrow paths, stretch out as far as the impenetrable thickets which cover the stagnant waters of White Oak Swamp with eternal verdure. The road forks within ten kilometres of Richmond, at a p
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
scrip at the option of the bearer. The provisions of the law of 1860 having been complied with by an offer of the fourteen millions scrip at par-an award which naturally found no takers—the Secretary, in virtue of this same law, issued on the 30th of May an equal amount of notes at six per cent. interest, which were chiefly used in satisfying his creditors. The position of the treasury department, therefore, was one of extreme difficulty; it was still further aggravated by the competition ibe treated as contrabands, but it was not so with the children; and yet who would have thought of surrendering them and keeping their parents? In reply to requests from Butler for instructions, the Secretary of War decided, in a despatch dated May 30th, that so long as a State continued in insurrection all fugitives seeking an asylum with the army should be received and protected without any reference to the question of their freedom. Whilst refusing to restore them for the time being, an exa
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
e, 1862, and can only give the following outline. On the 4th of May the army under Johnston at Yorktown, numbering about 55,000 men, was divided into four divisions: 1st, Magruder; 4 brigades, under D. R. Jones. 2d, G. Smith; 8 brigades, under Wilcox, A. P. Hill, Pickett, Colston, Hampton, Hood, Hatton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under Early, Rhodes, Garland and Rains. 4th, Longstreet; 4 or 5 brigades, under McLaws, Kershaw, Semmes and R. H. Anderson. On the 30th of May the army under Johnston at Richmond, about 70,000 strong, was divided into six divisions: 1st, Magruder; 6 brigades. 2d, Smith; 7 brigades, under Wilcox and Colston, Hampton, Hood, Hatton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under Early, Rhodes, Garland and Rains. 4th, Longstreet; 4 brigades, under McLaws, Kershaw, Semmes and R. H. Anderson. 5th, A. P. Hill; 2 or 3 brigades, under G. B. Anderson and Branch. 6th, Huger; 3 brigades, under Pryor, Mahone and Pickett.