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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
emy's right flank, where I felt I could cut off all his sources of supply except by the canal. On the 7th two divisions of cavalry, under General Sheridan, got off on the expedition against the Virginia Central Railroad with instructions to Hunter, whom I hoped he would meet near Charlottesville, to join his forces to Sheridan's, and afber the work laid out for them was thoroughly done to join the Army of the Potomac by the route laid down in Sheridan's instructions. On the 10th [9th] of June General Butler sent a force of infantry under General Gillmore, and of cavalry under General Kautz, to capture Petersburg if possible, and destroy the railroad and common bridges across the Appomattox. The cavalry carried the works on the south side and penetrated well in toward the town, but were forced to retire. General Gillmore, finding the works which he approached very strong, and deeming an assault impracticable, returned to Bermuda Hundred without attempting one. Attaching great im
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 12 (search)
a, Ga., in order to receive and accommodate the soldiery wounded in that action. It there remained until the last days of June, when it was brought to Big Shanty, but was sent to the rear in a few days, in consequence of that position being uncovereommissaries, even then many of the troops were not furnished more freely than before. The weather in the early part of June was pleasant and comparatively cool. On the evening of the 10th of that month it commenced raining and continued so to dore the field medical purveyor then was, rendered the transportation of them almost impossible. After the cessation of the June rains the weather continued pleasant, with light summer showers until the middle of August, when heavy rains came on once orps, resigned in the latter part of May and left when the army was in the neighborhood of Dallas, Ga. About the middle of June Surgs. C. W. Jones, U. S. Volunteers, and John W. Foye, U. S. Volunteers, were, respectively, assigned as medical directo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
ng which I man was killed and several wounded. On the morning of June 27 the regiment was on picket, and was relieved before light by a portion of the Third Brigade, and, with the brigade, was held in support of Newton's division while charging the enemy's lines. After the withdrawal of Newton's division, were again moved to the front line. In so doing Captain Harris, Company K, was wounded in the leg. Remained at this point alternately on front and rear lines till July 2. In the month of June the Thirty-eighth lost 1 commissioned officer and 26 enlisted men wounded, 1 enlisted man killed. On the night of July 2 moved to the left and relieved the One hundredth Illinois on picket. July 3, moved with the brigade several miles past Marietta. July 4, Captain Patrick, in command of the picket detail, was wounded in advancing the line, causing the loss of his left arm. July 5, moved to Vining's Station, near the Chattahoochee; laid there till the 10th, and were moved to the left.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
aptain: I have the honor to submit the following report of casualties in my command from June 4 to June 24, inclusive: Zzz Very respectfully, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. J. S. Ransom, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., 4th Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, In the Field, near Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., July 1, 1864. Captain : I have the honor to forward the following as the report of casualties of my command for the month of June: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. James S. Ransom, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., 4th Army Corps, Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 17, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to forward the following as the report of the casualties of my command for the days of July 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31, 1864: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brig
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 78 (search)
ualties during the whole campaign-showing a loss of I commissioned officer killed and 4 wounded, 7 enlisted men killed and 83 wounded, and 2 missing; total loss, 98-is herewith transmitted. When this regiment left McDonald's Station we had, say, 460 guns, and upon our return to this place only 250. After the campaign began I lost from 30 to 40 men from sore arms caused by vaccination with matter from other men's arms. This vaccination was done while in camp at McDonald's Station. In June and July the men were considerably afflicted with scurvy, and from sickness resulting from exposure to sun and rain. But about the 1st of August they began to get green corn in abundance, as well as some other vegetables, which had a most happy effect upon their health. Both officers and enlisted men have borne the perils, fatigues, and privations of this protracted campaign with wonderful courage and fortitude. The conduct of the commissioned officers of this regiment has been unifo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
eld, June 27, 1864. Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland: In accordance with his directions I have the honor herewith to forward for the information of the major-general commanding as perfect a list as can be given at this time of the casualties in my command during the operations of to-day. Very respectfully, John M. Palmer, Major-General, Commanding. Inclosure. Report of casualties in Fourteenth Army Corps during the operations of June Zzz headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, In the Field, June 29, 1864. Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland: General: In reply to your inquiry in regard to the discrepancy existing between my report of the wounded in the Second Division, of the Fourteenth Corps, and the report received from the surgeons, I have the honor to inclose a later report made by General Davis from data obtained yesterday, and to state as follows: It will be seen from this
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 108 (search)
hments; occupied this position until the 27th, losing 1 man killed and 2 wounded, being exposed during the time to the enemy's artillery, they having a battery planted in our immediate front and within 250 yards. Being relieved on the night of the 27th, was ordered in reserve into woods half a mile in rear, where we bivouacked until the night of July 2, at which time we moved to left and relieved troops of the Fifteenth Corps in front of Kenesaw Mountain. Distance marched during the month of June, eighteen miles. The enemy evacuating on the. night of July 2, the ensuing day we followed in pursuit, passing through Marietta, and overtaking the enemy at Neal Dow Station. At 3 p. m. the battalion was ordered out as skirmishers and was engaged until night-fall, losing 3 men wounded. Remained on the line all night and was relieved by the Eighteenth Infantry at daylight of the 4th. At 12 m. moved to the support of Prescott's battery, and at dusk relieved the Eighteenth Infantry on adv
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 111 (search)
under my command, during the Atlanta campaign, from the 14th of June to the 1st of September, 1864, inclusive, and respectfully request that it be included in the reports of the detachments already received from Capts. G. W. Smith and R. B. Hull. This report would have been rendered sooner but for the fact that I was severely wounded at the battle of Jonesborough, Ga., on the 1st of September, 1864. In front of Kenesaw Mountain the detachment lost, after I assumed command in the month of June, 8 enlisted men wounded. July 4, the detachment supported two batteries under a destructively severe artillery fire from the enemy; also charged rebel line of skirmishers, and drove them, thus causing, or materially aiding in causing, the whole rebel line to evacuate its position during the ensuing night. July 20, the detachment in the battle of Peach Tree Creek was under musketry fire, also subjected to severe shelling. July 22, intrenched within one and a half miles of Atlanta, Ga. Loss
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 113 (search)
work was thoroughly finished. On the 31st the enemy made a determined attack in force on the work, but was repulsed with heavy loss, the battalion sustaining a loss of Lieutenant Adair, wounded, and 33 enlisted men. The enemy were followed up by heavy skirmish line, under command of Captain Denton, and a new picket-line was established by him on the ground previously occupied by the enemy. The manner in which this was conducted by Captain Denton is deserving especial mention. On the Ist of June Lieut. R. F. Little joined. On the 6th, the enemy having retreated, the battalion marched to Big Shanty and rested till the 10th, when continued the march, feeling for the enemy. On the 22d, with the brigade, ielieved General Whitaker's brigade before Kenesaw Mountain, and remained under fire of the enemy's artillery and sharpshooters within seventy-five yards of his works till the 3d, when marched through Marietta in pursuit of the retreating enemy. At Kenesaw Lieutenant Wilcox was sent b
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
and scientific soldiers in the country, and a more devoted patriot than most of those born upon our soil, commanded the First Brigade with distinguished ability during the first half of the campaign. He was then, by a failure of health, compelled to resign, thus inflicting a great loss upon the service. Col. F. Van Derveer, Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, the brave and accomplished commander of the Second Brigade at Chickamauga and at Mission Ridge, remained with the command until the end of June. He also has, by expiration of service, been returned to civil life. Col. George P. Este, who has commanded the Third Brigade during the campaign; Col. N. Gleason, who has succeeded Colonel Van Derveer in command of the Second Brigade, and Col. M. B. Walker, who has succeeded Brigadier-General Turchin, have all exhibited a high degree of capacity. Their devotion to duty, their bravery in action, and their distinguished services throughout the campaign, merit reward, and I recommend them fo
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