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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
artments were expected to cooperate. Both Kirby Smith and Bragg were brave and skillful generals. The devotion of each to the cause in which they were enlisted was absolute, and their only ambition was to contribute to its success. In their characters the pettiness of personal rivalry could find no place, and either would willingly have relinquished to the other the honor of being the victor, if the victory could only have been won. It will be remembered how promptly, in the preceding June, General Bragg had weakened his own army and strengthened Smith's by sending McCown's division from Tupelo to Chattanooga, and again in August by sending the brigades of Cleburne and Preston Smith from Chattanooga to Knoxville; Spring near Perryville, which helped to relieve Bragg's parched army. From a photograph taken in 1885. and again, when Smith was pressed at Frankfort, that Bragg reenforced him promptly with one of his best divisions. That Kirby Smith would, at any time, have bee
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
along the enemy's front, was peculiarly exposed to attack — was in fact attacked while we were working on it and afterward; it was not supplied with rolling stock, and we derived no benefit from it, though the repairs detained us until the last of June. Foreseeing these embarrassments, I had given orders for the repair of the roads south from Nashville, and for the accumulation of supplies at that point. I desired also the option of making the advance through McMinnville and Kingston, which I res. It was at first in contemplation to move the Tupelo army upon my rear in middle Tennessee, but the wiser plan was adopted of concentrating in my front. One division of that army, and reeforcements from other quarters, reached Chattanooga in June. General Bragg arrived on the 30th of July, and by that time the transfer of his force from Tupelo was about completed. The nucleus of a force under Van Dorn and Price was left in Mississippi to neutralize the large Federal force on the Memphis a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
atch is not on file in the War Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letters received books of Howard's headquarters. The entry in Howard's book appears to have been made in the latter part of June. In Hooker's book a notation in red ink reads, Copy furnished General Howard ; and the inference is that it was this copy that was entered in Howard's book in June.--editors. From some confused notion it was issued to Slocum and Howard, when SlocJune.--editors. From some confused notion it was issued to Slocum and Howard, when Slocum was no longer within two miles of me, and had not been in command of my corps after Hooker's arrival at Chancellorsville. Slocum, naturally supposing that I had a copy, would not think of forwarding a joint order to me after that, and certainly no such order came to me. But Generals Devens, Schurz, and Steinwehr, my division commanders, and myself did precisely what we should have done had that order come. The three reserve batteries were put in position, and the infantry reserves were held
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
to four at most, and the divisions to twelve, the army would have been more manageable and better commanded, and the artillery, without any loss, but rather a gain of efficiency, would have been reduced by a dozen or fifteen batteries. Early in June Lee's army began to move, and by the 8th Longstreet's and Ewell's corps had joined Stuart's cavalry at Culpeper. A. P. Hill's corps was left in observation at Fredericksburg; and so skillfully were the changes concealed that Hooker, believing thas — caused delays until the fugitives from Milroy's command, followed by Jenkins's cavalry, roused the country. Defensive works were then thrown up at Harrisburg and else-where, and local forces were raised and moved toward the enemy. Early in June Hooker represented in strong terms the necessity of having one commander for all the troops whose operations would have an influence on those of Lee's army, and in reply was informed by Halleck that any movements he might suggest for other command
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The cavalry battle near Gettysburg. (search)
a charge is entitled to the presumption that, for decisions such as these, he had good and sufficient reasons, whatever may, at the time, have been the opinion of subordinates on whom did not rest the final responsibility of success or failure; yet in fact, in both these decisions General Meade was supported by a preponderance of authoritative opinion among his corps commanders and the staff-officers of greatest reputation. I believe that, as time goes on and the events of the last days of June and the first days of July, 1863, are more and more carefully studied, in the light of all the facts, and with an impartial and dispassionate spirit, the weighty judgment of the illustrious chief of the Union artillery, General Henry J. Hunt, In his letter to General A. S. Webb, January 19th, 1888, quoted by permission.--F. A. W. will be more and more fully approved. He was right in his orders as to Pipe Creek; right, in his determination under certain circumstances to fall back to it; ri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
ision at Little Rock on the 1st of April. Holmes's entire force in Arkansas and the Indian Territory at that time (exclusive of Walker's division which was soon sent to Taylor in Louisiana) aggregated less than 12,500 officers and men. Seven thousand of these constituted Price's division, which was stationed near Little Rock. With them Price Map of the battle of Helena, Arkansas. would have done something had he not been repressed by both Smith and Holmes. At last toward the middle of June Kirby Smith determined to do something for the relief of Vicksburg, and as the President had frequently suggested an attack upon Helena he ordered Holmes to move from Little Rock for that place. He could hardly have done anything more unwise, for Helena was garrisoned by 5000 men, and was strongly fortified. It was also protected by gun-boats, and could not have been held 24 hours even if it had been taken. The Confederates bivouacked within five miles of Helena on the evening of the 3d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in Arkansas, December 7th, 1862--September 14th, 1863. (search)
: 37th Ill., Lieut.-Col. John C. Black (w), Maj. Henry M. Frisbie; 20th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Leake; 2d Battalion, 6th Mo. Cav., Maj. Samuel Montgomery; F, 1st Mo. Art'y, Capt. David Murphy. Brigade loss: k, 17; w, 99; m, 38=154. Third div) Battery, Capt. Charles G. Cooley: 17th Ohio Battery, Capt. Ambrose A. Blount. Artillery loss: w, 1. Cavalry: Squadron 6th Mo., Col. Clark Wright. Second division, Brigadier-General Peter J. Osterhaus. First Brigade, Col. Lionel A. Sheldon: 11vid Stuart. First Brigade, Col. Giles A. Smith: 113th Ill., Col. George B. Hoge; 116th Ill., Lieut.-Col. James P. Boyd; 6th Mo., Lieut.-Col. James H. Blood; 8th Mo., Lieut.-Col. David C. Coleman (w); Maj. Dennis T. Kirby; 13th U. S. (1st Battalion) Young's Battalion,----. Brigade loss : k, 5; w, 7 = 12. Shelby's Brigade, Col. Joseph O. Shelby (w): 5th Mo. Cav.,----; 6th Mo. Cav.,---; Jeans's Regiment,----; Mo. Battery (Bledsoe's),----. Brigade loss: k, 8; w, 45; m, 1=54. Total Confederate
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Chickasaw bluffs (or First Vicksburg), Miss.: December 27th, 1862--January 3d, 1863. (search)
wan; 48th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Job R. Parker. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Morgan L. Smith (w), Brig.-Gen. David Stuart. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Col. Giles A. Smith: 113th Ill., Col. George B. Hoge; 116th Ill., Col. Nathan W. Tupper; 6th Mo., Lieut.-Col. James H. Blood; 8th Mo., Lieut.-Col. David C. Coleman; 13th U. S. (1st Battalion), Maj. Dudley Chase. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 63 == 78. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. David Stuart, Col. T. Kilby Smith: 55th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Oscar Malmrtillery A, 1st Ill., Capt. Peter P. Wood; B, 1st Ill., Capt. Samuel E. Barrett; H, 1st Ill., Lieut. Levi W. Hart; Chicago (Ill.) Mercantile, Capt. Charles G. Cooley; 8th Ohio, Lieut. James F. Putnam; 17th Ohio, Capt. Ambrose A. Blount. Cavalry: 6th Mo., Col. Clark Wright; 3d Ill., Col. Lafayette McCrillis; Thielemann's (Ill.) Battalion. The total loss of the Union army was 208 killed, 1005 wounded, and 563 captured or missing == 1776. The effective strength of the expeditionary force is esti
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
al forces which produced that result was made practicable by the military errors of the Confederate Government in 1862, and was made successful by its repetition of the gravest of those errors in 1863. The Confederate army that fought at Shiloh was reorganized by General Beauregard at Corinth, and occupied that position until the 29th of May, 1862, when that officer led it to Tupelo in consequence of the near approach of General Halleck's vastly superior forces. There, about the middle of June, General Beauregard was compelled by ill health to transfer his command to General Bragg. The discipline and instruction of those troops had been greatly improved at Corinth and Tupelo; so that they were in excellent condition for marches and for battles before the middle of July. They numbered 45,000. There were 22,000 other Confederate troops in Mississippi, in two bodies, one commanded by Major-General Van Dorn, the other by Major-General Price. Those two officers were independent of e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Vicksburg campaign: May 1st-July 4th, 1863. (search)
; m, 13 =61. Big Black Bridge, k, 10; w, 14; m, 1=25. Vicksburg, assault May 19th, k, 1; w, 34 = 35; assault May 22d, k, 14; w, 63; m, 1=78. Cavalry: 2d Ill. (5 co's), Lieut.-Col. Daniel B. Bush, Jr.; 3d Ill. (3 co's), Capt. John L. Camlp-bell; 6th Mo. (7 cox's , Col. Clark Wright. Cavalry loss: Champion's Hill, k, 2; w, 2 = 4. Artillery, Capt. Jacob T. Foster: 7th Mich., Capt. Charles H. Lanphere; 1st Wis., Lieut. Charles B. Kimball, Lieut. Oscar F. Nutting. Artillery loss: Port Gibson, k, eut. Thomas J. Beebe; D, 3d Ill., Lieut. Jonathan Kershner. Second division, Maj.-Gen. Frank P. Blair, Jr. First Brigade, Col. Giles A. Smith: 113th Ill., Col. George B. Hoge, Lieut.-Col. John W. Paddock; 116th Ill., Col. Nathan W. Tupper; 6th Mo., Lieut.-Col. Ira Boutell, Col. James H. Blood; 8th Mo., Lieut.-Col. David C. Coleman; 13th U. S. (lst Battalion), Capt. Edward C. Washington (m w), Capt. Charles Ewing, Capt. Charles C. Smith. Brigade loss: Vicksburg, assault May 19th, k, 37; w
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