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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
14th of December, at which the town appointed Allen Mason and Mason Brown agents to recruit seventeen men to fill the quota of the town under the new call of the President; and that they be allowed and paid two dollars and fifty cents a day while engaged in the work, and reasonable travelling expenses. 1864. Several meetings were held during this year to devise ways and means to encourage recruiting and to provide State aid for the soldiers' families, the last of which was on the 14th of June, when the recruiting agents were directed to recruit men to fill the quota of the town, under a call which it was expected the President would soon issue. Nathan M. Woods was added to the committee to assist in recruiting. The treasurer was directed to borrow money, and to pay each volunteer, when properly credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. This system, without material alteration, was continued until the end of the war. The selectmen repo
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
, Jr.; in 1862, Hiram C. Brown, Lyman Twining, George W. Granger; in 1863 and 1864, George W. Granger, Philander F. Twining, Lyman Twining; in 1865, George W. Granger, Philander F. Twining, Nathan E. Slocum. The town-clerk during the years 1861 and 1862 was Rufus Smith. During 1863, 1864, and 1865, William W. Harrison. The town-treasurer all through the war was Edward L. Tinker. 1861. The first legal town-meeting held in Tolland, to act upon matters connected with the war, was held in June, at which it was voted to raise one hundred and fifty dollars to pay State aid to the families of volunteers living in the town. 1862. January—, One hundred and seventy dollars were appropriated for the same purpose. July—, Eight hundred and forty dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to volunteers enlisting to fill the quota of the town. August—, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars for each volunteer to fill our quota of nine-months men called for by the Preside<