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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
destruction of their enemies; who, when smitten on the one cheek, turn the other also to the smiter; and who are willing to die for their foes, as did Jesus for his, rather than to imprison, maim, or destroy them! The doctrines defended in the foregoing extracts continued, as heretofore, to be merely subsidiary to Mr. Garrison's lifework. They were the unfailing feeders of his Ante, 2.305. anti-slavery courage, energy, and persistence. We have never, said the editor of the Liberator in June, devoted Lib. 11.99. more of our time to the anti-slavery movement than we have for the last three years. We are literally absorbed 1839-1841. in that movement. We have yet to deliver our first public lecture on the Church, the Sabbath, or the Ministry, or even on non-resistance. We have been nominally Ante, 2.326. one of the editors of the Non-Resistant for a period of two and a half years; and, during that time, we have not devoted half a day to the writing of editorial matter for its
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
a resolutions, the hall was crowded in the evening, when I opened my budget of heresies on the subject of temple worship, the church, the priesthood, the Sabbath, etc., which created no small stir. The next day, S. S. Foster arrived, He was out on bail from Leverett-Street jail, Boston, having been committed on an absurd charge of assaulting the constable who took Latimer thither, and with whom he simply remonstrated as they walked along (Lib. 12.187). Mr. Foster had already this year, in June, made acquaintance with the same jail, after a forcible expulsion—by the Rev. A. St. Clair and other divines—from the Evangelical Congregational A. S. Convention in Boston (Lib. 12: 90, 129), and still earlier, in May, had been jailed in Amherst, N. H., for interrupting the services in a Baptist church by speaking in behalf of the slave ( Acts of the A. S. Apostles, p. 266; Lib. 12: 94). This practice, long conscientiously kept up, induced untold clerical and diaconal assaults upon Mr. Foste
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
made President of the American Society, of which the direction passes over to Boston. Zzzr. Garrison returned to his editorial duties in the latter part of January, 1843, but his health Lib. 13.10. was far from restored. He struggled on till June, when a mysterious distress in the left side again caused him Ms. Apr. 15, 1843, W. L. G. to G. W. Benson. grave apprehensions that he had not long to live. His latest residence in Cambridgeport, though very healthfully situated, was associated R. D. Webb; Lib. 13: 23, 27. which drew off many abolitionists from the ranks, including Charles Fitch and J. V. Himes, and was controverted by the editor of the Liberator in two elaborate articles. Communism and socialism also diverted many. In June, Mr. Garrison attended as a spectator two meetings, in the Chardon-Street Chapel, for the discussion of the questions pertaining to the reorganization of society and the rights of property, Lib. 13.91. in which Collins took a leading part. He hea
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
Mr. Garrison was already implicated in the painful controversy between the New Hampshire Society and his dear friend Rogers, whose sensitive nature he understood but too well. He had, on occasion of French's stopping the Herald of Freedom, in June, without warning to the Lib. 14.106. Society of which it was at once the property and the organ, Lib. 14.198. urgently bespoken for it the needed support, praising with his customary heartiness Rogers's editorial ability, and Lib. 14.106. was rmembers of every A. S. Society whose meetings they will take the trouble to attend, and especially in New Hampshire, as Rogers had always disclaimed any territorial divisions of Abolition, and, no longer ago than when French stopped the paper last June, had declared that Anti-Slavery knows no State lines, Anti-Slavery knows no New Hampshire! So to the meeting we went, and the result you will find in the Standard Lib. 14.195, 198, 205. Liberator. . . . We went home in hopes that Rogers woul
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
inform you that he says this is a mistake—that, on the contrary, he did speak to Mr. G. about it just before he was taken ill at Cleveland. Mr. Garrison, however, has no recollection whatever of it (Ms.). While Mr. Garrison is overtaking his companion at Buffalo, we may pause to consider the state of the Liberty Party about to meet in that city, for the last time in its collective capacity. Rather it was a question whether the organization was not already done for. In the second week in June a Fourth Party had gone out from it, June 8-10, 1847. forming a Liberty League at Macedon Lock, N. Y., under the auspices of J. G. Birney, Gerrit Smith, William Lib. 17.106. Goodell, Beriah Green, William L. Chaplin, James C. Jackson, and others. Its twenty articles consisted of those extraneous topics which began to press for admittance as soon as the Third Party had been launched Ante, 2.435. on the nominal basis of immediate emancipation,—as, for example, free trade, direct taxation,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
nd—I come to break the bonds of the oppressor. A flowing scroll, unifying the design, bore the injunction, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. So far had blasphemy corrupted the editor. Miss Martineau, who had illustrated in the most signal manner both the intellectual and the political capacity of her sex, penned the letter just quoted on the day of the opening at Worcester of the first Woman's Rights Lib. 20.142, 175, 181. Convention in Massachusetts. Mr. Garrison had attended in June a preliminary meeting, in Boston, at which he Lib. 20.91. spoke in hearty approval of the movement: I rise, he said, to give my support, however feeble it may Lib. 20.91. be, to the object which is sought to be accomplished by this meeting. I do so all the more cheerfully, not only because this movement is in its infancy, but because it will be sure to encounter popular odium at first, and to subject its advocates to ridicule. It is under just such circumstances that I wish to be
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
your influence, like another atmosphere, shall encircle the globe, and you shall be the heralds and the instruments of freedom to all the nations of the earth. (Loud cheers.) It was high time, for physical reasons, that Mr. Thompson should be taking his departure. His proposed rest during the Parliamentary recess had been turned into a gigantic labor, which returned him to his own country almost a used — up man. With an excursion to Lib. 21.94, 98. Philadelphia during the first week in June, he closed his American tour. There remained the farewell soiree arranged for him by vote of the New England Convention, and held in Lib. 21.90. Boston on June 16 in the large hall over the Albany Lib. 21.98, 101. Railroad depot — a feast at which more than a thousand plates were spread. Edmund Quincy of right presided. Phillips and Parker were among the speakers. Garrison delivered Lib. 21.101. the parting address. It was a glorious occasion, but we must pass over its details. Tho
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 18: the irrepressible Conflict.—1858. (search)
Massachusetts and New York must again be surrendered by their farmers to slave culture and to the production of slaves, and Boston and New York become once more markets for trade in the bodies and souls of men. It is the failure to apprehend this great truth that induces so many unsuccessful attempts at final compromise between the slave and free States; and it is the existence of this great fact that renders all such pretended compromises, when made, vain and ephemeral. At the West, in June, Abraham Lincoln had embodied the same truth in the less immediately famous sentence, already quoted, depicting the house divided against itself, Ante, p. 420. and prophesying that it would ultimately become wholly one thing or the other. His successful rival for the United States Senate, Stephen A. Douglas, repudiated Lib. 28.193. the dictum alike of the statesman unanimously predesignated as the Republican candidate for President in 1860, and of the obscure Illinois politician who was in
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
linois lawyer's brief Congressional career caused him to misinterpret and unjustly characterize a measure of Lincoln's intended to Jan. 10, 1849; Lib. 30.119. effect abolition in the District of Columbia, but accompanied by what seemed a necessary provision for the surrender of fugitive slaves —else had the District become a refuge for them from the adjoining States of Maryland and Virginia, and from the whole seaboard. Singling out this provision, Mr. Phillips published in the Liberator of June Lib. 30.99. 22, 1860, a stinging article, headed, Abraham Lincoln, the Slave-hound of Illinois, and beginning: We gibbet a Northern hound to-day, side by side with the infamous Mason of Virginia. Mr. Garrison very reluctantly J. M. Mason. admitted both the caption and the text (of the justice of which he had no means of forming an opinion), and only in consideration of the article being signed. Mr. Lincoln did not lack defenders, and in the end Mr. Phillips Lib. 30.119. produced a tran